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Modelling non-demanders in choice experiments

  • Mandy Ryan

    (Health Economics Research Unit, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, UK)

  • Diane Skåtun

    (Health Economics Research Unit, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, UK)

Registered author(s):

    Discrete choice experiments have the advantage that they can study preferences in health care where revealed preference data is not readily available. However, as a substitute for actual observed market led data, the experimental set-up for hypothetical situations must mimic the circumstances under which actual choices are made. One situation that a consumer|patient might face is an opt-out option. They might not choose to accept any of the positive actions available and as such will be a non-demander of the health care on offer. This paper explores issues raised in the modelling of such data within an experiment looking at women's preferences for cervical screening services. Copyright © 2003 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1002/hec.821
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    Article provided by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. in its journal Health Economics.

    Volume (Year): 13 (2004)
    Issue (Month): 4 ()
    Pages: 397-402

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    Handle: RePEc:wly:hlthec:v:13:y:2004:i:4:p:397-402
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/5749

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    1. Gates, Roger & McDaniel, Carl & Braunsberger, Karin, 2000. "Modeling Consumer Health Plan Choice Behavior To Improve Customer Value and Health Plan Market Share," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 48(3), pages 247-257, June.
    2. repec:cup:cbooks:9780521788304 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. David Revelt & Kenneth Train, 1998. "Mixed Logit With Repeated Choices: Households' Choices Of Appliance Efficiency Level," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 80(4), pages 647-657, November.
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