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Willingness-to-Pay Estimates and Their Relevance to Agribusiness Decision Making


  • Jayson L. Lusk
  • Darren Hudson


Although methods such as contingent valuation have received a great deal of attention in environmental valuation literature, fewer studies have reported willingness-to-pay estimates with agribusiness applications. Because agribusinesses are increasingly interested in producing and selling differentiated goods and services whose values has not been established by well-functioning markets, we provide a short introduction to willingness-to-pay methodology and provide a discussion of several different methods used to estimate willingness-to-pay. More specifically, we discuss how much of the work in environmental and experimental valuation literature can be extended to agribusiness applications, which have their own set of unique issues. Copyright 2004, Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Jayson L. Lusk & Darren Hudson, 2004. "Willingness-to-Pay Estimates and Their Relevance to Agribusiness Decision Making," Review of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 26(2), pages 152-169.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:revage:v:26:y:2004:i:2:p:152-169

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Shogren, Jason F. & Margolis, Michael & Koo, Cannon & List, John A., 2001. "A random nth-price auction," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 46(4), pages 409-421, December.
    2. Laura O. Taylor & Ronald G. Cummings, 1999. "Unbiased Value Estimates for Environmental Goods: A Cheap Talk Design for the Contingent Valuation Method," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 89(3), pages 649-665, June.
    3. Swait, Joffre & Adamowicz, Wiktor, 2001. " The Influence of Task Complexity on Consumer Choice: A Latent Class Model of Decision Strategy Switching," Journal of Consumer Research, Oxford University Press, vol. 28(1), pages 135-148, June.
    4. Buhr, Brian L. & Hayes, Dermot J. & Shogren, Jason F. & Kliebenstein, James B., 1993. "Valuing Ambiguity: The Case Of Genetically Engineered Growth Enhancers," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 18(02), December.
    5. David Revelt & Kenneth Train, 1998. "Mixed Logit With Repeated Choices: Households' Choices Of Appliance Efficiency Level," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 80(4), pages 647-657, November.
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