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Ulysses' pact or Ulysses' raft: Using pre‐analysis plans in experimental and nonexperimental research

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  • Sarah A. Janzen
  • Jeffrey D. Michler

Abstract

Economists have recently adopted pre‐analysis plans in response to concerns about robustness and transparency in research. The increased use of registered pre‐analysis plans has raised competing concerns that detailed plans are costly to create, overly restrictive, and limit the type of inspiration that stems from exploratory analysis. We consider these competing views of pre‐analysis plans, and make a careful distinction between the roles of pre‐analysis plans and registries, which provide a record of all planned research. We propose a flexible “packraft” pre‐analysis plan approach that offers benefits for a wide variety of experimental and nonexperimental applications in applied economics. JEL CLASSIFICATION A14; B41; C12; C18; C90; O10; Q00

Suggested Citation

  • Sarah A. Janzen & Jeffrey D. Michler, 2021. "Ulysses' pact or Ulysses' raft: Using pre‐analysis plans in experimental and nonexperimental research," Applied Economic Perspectives and Policy, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 43(4), pages 1286-1304, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:apecpp:v:43:y:2021:i:4:p:1286-1304
    DOI: 10.1002/aepp.13133
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    Cited by:

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    3. Andrew C. Chang & Linda R. Cohen & Amihai Glazer & Urbashee Paul, 2021. "Politicians Avoid Tax Increases Around Elections," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2021-004, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • A14 - General Economics and Teaching - - General Economics - - - Sociology of Economics
    • B41 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - Economic Methodology - - - Economic Methodology
    • C12 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Hypothesis Testing: General
    • C18 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Methodolical Issues: General
    • C90 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - General
    • O10 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - General
    • Q00 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - General - - - General

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