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The Impact of Family Composition on Educational Achievement

Author

Listed:
  • Stacey H. Chen
  • Yen-Chien Chen
  • Jin-Tan Liu

Abstract

Parents preferring sons tend to go on having more children until a boy is born and to concentrate investment in boys for a given number of children (sibsize). Thus, having a brother may affect a child’s education in two ways: an indirect effect by keeping sibsize lower and a direct rivalry effect where sibsize remains constant. We estimate the direct and indirect effects of a next brother on the first child’s education conditional on potential sibsize. We address endogenous sibsize using twins. We find new evidence of sibling rivalry and gender bias that cannot be detected by conventional methods.

Suggested Citation

  • Stacey H. Chen & Yen-Chien Chen & Jin-Tan Liu, 2019. "The Impact of Family Composition on Educational Achievement," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 54(1), pages 122-170.
  • Handle: RePEc:uwp:jhriss:v:54:y:2019:i:1:p:122-170
    Note: DOI: 10.3368/jhr.54.1.0915.7401R1
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Xiaoyan Lei & Yan Shen & James P. Smith & Guangsu Zhou, 2017. "Sibling gender composition’s effect on education: evidence from China," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 30(2), pages 569-590, April.
    2. repec:bla:obuest:v:79:y:2017:i:6:p:1087-1124 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics
    • I25 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Economic Development
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration

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