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Son Preference, Fertility Decline and the Non-Missing Girls of Turkey

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  • Onur Altindag

    (Ph.D Program in Economics, Graduate Center, CUNY)

Abstract

Couples in Turkey exhibit son preference through son-biased differential stopping behavior that does not cause a sex ratio imbalance in the population. Demand for sons leads to lower ratios of boys to girls in larger families but higher ratios in smaller families. Girls are born earlier than their male siblings, and son-biased fertility behavior is persistent in response to decline in fertility over time and across households with parents from different backgrounds. Parents use contraceptive methods to halt fertility following a male birth. The sibling sex composition is associated with gender disparities in health. Among third- or later-born children, female infant mortality is 1.5 percentage points lower if the previous sibling is male. The female survival advantage, however, disappears if the previous sibling is female. Having an older female sib- ling shifts the gender gap in infant mortality rate by 2 percentage points in favor of males. The improvement in infant mortality is strongest in favor of males who do not have an older male sibling.

Suggested Citation

  • Onur Altindag, 2015. "Son Preference, Fertility Decline and the Non-Missing Girls of Turkey," Working Papers 5, City University of New York Graduate Center, Ph.D. Program in Economics, revised 20 Mar 2016.
  • Handle: RePEc:cgc:wpaper:005
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    File URL: http://wfs.gc.cuny.edu/Economics/RePEc/cgc/wpaper/CUNYGC-WP005R2.pdf
    File Function: Revised version, July 2015; Second revised version, March 2016
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    Cited by:

    1. Aurélien Dasre & Angela Greulich & Inan Ceren, 2017. "Combating domestic violence against women in Turkey. The role of women's economic empowerment," Post-Print halshs-01660703, HAL.
    2. Battaglia, Marianna & Chabé-Ferret, Bastien & Lebedinski, Lara, 2021. "Segregation, fertility, and son preference: the case of the Roma in Serbia," Journal of Demographic Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 87(2), pages 233-260, June.
    3. Aurélien Dasre & Angela Greulich & Inan Ceren, 2017. "Combating domestic violence against women in Turkey. The role of women's economic empowerment," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) halshs-01660703, HAL.
    4. Sehar Ezdi & Ahmet Melik Baş, 2020. "Gender preferences and fertility: Investigating the case of Turkish immigrants in Germany," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 43(3), pages 59-96.
    5. Vu, Tien Manh & Yamada, Hiroyuki, 2020. "Sex Ratio and Religion in Vietnam," MPRA Paper 98854, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Seik Kim & Sam-Ho Lee, 0. "Son Preference and Fertility Decisions: Evidence From Spatiotemporal Variation in Korea," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 0, pages 1-25.
    7. Qianqian Shang & Quanbao Jiang & Yongkun Yin, 2022. "How Does Children's Sex Affect Parental Sex Preference: Preference Adaptation and Learning," Working Papers wp2022_2202, CEMFI.
    8. Seik Kim & Sam-Ho Lee, 2020. "Son Preference and Fertility Decisions: Evidence From Spatiotemporal Variation in Korea," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 57(3), pages 927-951, June.
    9. Sarah Carol & Karsten Hank, 2020. "Natives’ and Immigrants’ Gender Preferences for Children in Germany," European Journal of Population, Springer;European Association for Population Studies, vol. 36(2), pages 235-246, April.
    10. Zurab Abramishvili & William Appleman & Sergii Maksymovych, 2019. "Parental Gender Preference in the Balkans and Scandinavia: Gender Bias or Differential Costs?," CERGE-EI Working Papers wp643, The Center for Economic Research and Graduate Education - Economics Institute, Prague.
    11. Eleanor Jawon Choi & Jisoo Hwang, 2020. "Transition of Son Preference: Evidence From South Korea," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 57(2), pages 627-652, April.
    12. Aurélien Dasré & Angela Greulich & Ceren Inan, 2017. "Combating domestic violence against women in Turkey. The role of women's economic empowerment," Documents de travail du Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne 17052, Université Panthéon-Sorbonne (Paris 1), Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne.
    13. Anna‐Maria Aksan, 2022. "Son preference and the demographic transition," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 26(1), pages 32-56, February.
    14. Nahid Tavassoli, 2021. "The Gender-Biased Fertility Behavior: Evidence from Southeast Asian Countries," Economic Alternatives, University of National and World Economy, Sofia, Bulgaria, issue 2, pages 235-261, July.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Son preference; Differential stopping behavior; Fertility;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • I15 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health and Economic Development
    • J10 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - General

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