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A formal theory for male-preferring stopping rules of childbearing: sex differences in birth order and in the number of siblings

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  • Kazuo Yamaguchi

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  • Kazuo Yamaguchi, 1989. "A formal theory for male-preferring stopping rules of childbearing: sex differences in birth order and in the number of siblings," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 26(3), pages 451-465, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:demogr:v:26:y:1989:i:3:p:451-465
    DOI: 10.2307/2061604
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Easterlin, Richard A., 1987. "Birth and Fortune," University of Chicago Press Economics Books, University of Chicago Press, edition 2, number 9780226180328, March.
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