IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/taf/edecon/v14y2006i4p487-509.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

State Aid and Student Performance: A Supply-Demand Analysis

Author

Listed:
  • Henry Kinnucan
  • Yuqing Zheng
  • Gerald Brehmer

Abstract

Using a supply-demand framework, a six-equation model is specified to generate hypotheses about the relationship between state aid and student performance. Theory predicts that an increase in state or federal aid provides an incentive to decrease local funding, but that the disincentive associated with increased state aid is moderated when federal aid is compensatory. Applying the theory to Alabama county school test score data, results suggest that between 62 and 73 cents of the incremental state dollar goes to schools; the rest is absorbed by local taxpayers through incidence shifting, and by the federal government through the compensatory mechanism. Despite these 'leakages', results suggest that increased state aid can improve student performance provided the incremental funding goes to teacher salaries and not to reductions in class size. Poverty reduction or income growth, however, might accomplish the same ends at lower cost.

Suggested Citation

  • Henry Kinnucan & Yuqing Zheng & Gerald Brehmer, 2006. "State Aid and Student Performance: A Supply-Demand Analysis," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(4), pages 487-509.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:edecon:v:14:y:2006:i:4:p:487-509
    DOI: 10.1080/09645290600854177
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/09645290600854177
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Eric A. Hanushek, 2004. "What if there are no 'best practices'?," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 51(2), pages 156-172, May.
    2. George A. Akerlof & Rachel E. Kranton, 2002. "Identity and Schooling: Some Lessons for the Economics of Education," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 40(4), pages 1167-1201, December.
    3. David Mayston, "undated". "Educational Attainment and Resource Use: Mystery or Econometric Misspecification," Discussion Papers 96/17, Department of Economics, University of York.
    4. Rosalind Levacic & Anna Vignoles, 2002. "Researching the Links between School Resources and Student Outcomes in the UK: A Review of Issues and Evidence," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 10(3), pages 313-331.
    5. Brasington, D. M., 2003. "The supply of public school quality," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 22(4), pages 367-377, August.
    6. Hanushek, Eric A, 1986. "The Economics of Schooling: Production and Efficiency in Public Schools," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 24(3), pages 1141-1177, September.
    7. Dewey, James & Husted, Thomas A. & Kenny, Lawrence W., 1999. "The ineffectiveness of school inputs: a product of misspecification?," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 19(1), pages 27-45, February.
    8. Mark C. Berger & Eugenia F. Toma, 1994. "Variation in state education policies and effects on student performance," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 13(3), pages 477-491.
    9. Hanushek, E.A.omson, W., 1996. "Assessing the Effects of School Resources on Student Performance : An Update," RCER Working Papers 424, University of Rochester - Center for Economic Research (RCER).
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Henry W. KINNUCAN & Martin D. SMITH & Yuqing ZHENG & Jose R. LLANES, 2012. "The Effects of No Child Left Behind on Student Performance in Alabama’s Rural Schools," Regional and Sectoral Economic Studies, Euro-American Association of Economic Development, vol. 12(1), pages 5-24.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:taf:edecon:v:14:y:2006:i:4:p:487-509. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Chris Longhurst). General contact details of provider: http://www.tandfonline.com/CEDE20 .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.