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Are valuations of place-based amenities driven by scale?

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  • Pia Nilsson

Abstract

Amenities play an important role in explaining regional attractiveness as they increase the competition between places and the demand for housing. This paper contributes to the literature on valuations of place-based amenities by estimating hedonic prices for a differentiated set of amenities, and by examining the link between urban density and amenity valuations. The empirical analysis is based on a sample of 8319 single-family home sales observed during the period 2001–2011. Results show that amenities are valued differently depending on their size, the relationship between size and distance and neighbourhood characteristics. Differentiating among a set of nature- and culture based amenities shows that it is profoundly the value of proximity to open space that vary with neighbourhood density. Results are robust when testing for non-constant implicit prices over different time periods and novel to the literature on valuation of open spaces using the hedonic price model.

Suggested Citation

  • Pia Nilsson, 2017. "Are valuations of place-based amenities driven by scale?," Housing Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 32(4), pages 449-469, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:chosxx:v:32:y:2017:i:4:p:449-469
    DOI: 10.1080/02673037.2016.1219330
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1080/02673037.2016.1219330
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    Cited by:

    1. Guojun Zhang & Yunliang Chen & Ming Li & Chunshan Zhou, 2019. "Evaluation of Residential Housing Prices on the Internet: Data Pitfalls," Complexity, Hindawi, vol. 2019, pages 1-15, February.
    2. Liebelt, Veronika & Bartke, Stephan & Schwarz, Nina, 2018. "Revealing Preferences for Urban Green Spaces: A Scale-sensitive Hedonic Pricing Analysis for the City of Leipzig," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 146(C), pages 536-548.

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