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The Spatial Segregation of Ethnic and Demographic Groups: Comparative Evidence from Stockholm and San Francisco

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  • Harsman, Bjorn
  • Quigley, John M.

Abstract

This paper compares the level of spatial segregation by race or ethnicity with the level of spatial segregation by demographic group in two metropolitan areas with similar incomes and demographic compositions, but with very different racial proportions. We compare census tract data for the San Francisco Bay Area for 1980, a region with six large ethnic divisions, with similar data for the Stockholm metropolitan area, a region with a much more homogeneous racial composition. An extensive comparison of entropy measures of segregation in the two regions is presented, including for Stockholm, an analysis of spatial segregation by income class. One important finding of the analysis, replicated in two very different metropolitan regions, is that spatial segregation by race or ethnicity is unrelated to the principal economic factors which presumable underly spatial segregation by income clss or demographic grouping.

Suggested Citation

  • Harsman, Bjorn & Quigley, John M., 1993. "The Spatial Segregation of Ethnic and Demographic Groups: Comparative Evidence from Stockholm and San Francisco," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt910306b7, University of California Transportation Center.
  • Handle: RePEc:cdl:uctcwp:qt910306b7
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Struyk, Raymond J. & Turner, Margery A., 1986. "Exploring the effects of racial preferences on urban housing markets," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(2), pages 131-147, March.
    2. Harsman Bjorn & Quigley John M., 1995. "The Spatial Segregation of Ethnic and Demographic Groups: Comparative Evidence from Stockholm and San Francisco," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 1-16, January.
    3. Vincent P. Miller & John M. Quigley, 1990. "Segregation by Racial and Demographic Group: Evidence from the San Francisco Bay Area," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 27(1), pages 3-21, February.
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    Cited by:

    1. Bayer, Patrick & McMillan, Robert & Rueben, Kim S., 2004. "What drives racial segregation? New evidence using Census microdata," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 56(3), pages 514-535, November.
    2. Patrick Bayer & Robert McMillan, 2005. "Racial Sorting and Neighborhood Quality," NBER Working Papers 11813, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Patrick Bayer & Robert McMillan & Kim Rueben, 2003. "An Equilibrium Model of Sorting in an Urban Housing Market: A Study of the Causes and Consequences of Residential Segregation," Working Papers 03-01, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
    4. Bourassa, Steven C. & Hoesli, Martin & Peng, Vincent S., 2003. "Do housing submarkets really matter?," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 12(1), pages 12-28, March.
    5. Olof Åslund & John Östh & Yves Zenou, 2010. "How important is access to jobs? Old question--improved answer," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 10(3), pages 389-422, May.
    6. Patrick Bayer & Robert McMillan & Kim Rueben, 2003. "An Equilibrium Model of Sorting in an Urban Housing Market: The Causes and Consequences of Residential Segregation," Working Papers 860, Economic Growth Center, Yale University.
    7. Bayer, Patrick & Fang, Hanming & McMillan, Robert, 2014. "Separate when equal? Racial inequality and residential segregation," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 82(C), pages 32-48.
    8. De la Roca, Jorge & Ellen, Ingrid Gould & O'Regan, Katherine M., 2014. "Race and neighborhoods in the 21st century: What does segregation mean today?," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 138-151.
    9. Harsman Bjorn & Quigley John M., 1995. "The Spatial Segregation of Ethnic and Demographic Groups: Comparative Evidence from Stockholm and San Francisco," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 1-16, January.
    10. Joao Lourenço Marques & Eduardo Castro & Arnab Bhattacharjee & Paulo Batista, 2012. "SPATIAL HETEROGENEITY ACROSS SUBMARKETS: Housing submarket in an urban area of Portugal," ERSA conference papers ersa12p1111, European Regional Science Association.
    11. Patrick Bayer & Robert McMillan & Kim Rueben, 2004. "Residential Segregation in General Equilibrium," Working Papers 885, Economic Growth Center, Yale University.
    12. Claude Fischer & Gretchen Stockmayer & Jon Stiles & Michael Hout, 2004. "Distinguishing the geographic levels and social dimensions of U.S. metropolitan segregation, 1960–2000," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 41(1), pages 37-59, February.
    13. Monkkonen, Paavo & Zhang, Xiaohu, 2014. "Innovative measurement of spatial segregation: Comparative evidence from Hong Kong and San Francisco," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 99-111.
    14. Claudio Agostini, 2010. "Pobreza, Desigualdad y Segregación en la Región Metropolitana," ILADES-Georgetown University Working Papers inv242, Ilades-Georgetown University, Universidad Alberto Hurtado/School of Economics and Bussines.

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