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SPATIAL HETEROGENEITY ACROSS SUBMARKETS: Housing submarket in an urban area of Portugal

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  • Joao Lourenço Marques
  • Eduardo Castro
  • Arnab Bhattacharjee
  • Paulo Batista

Abstract

Spatial homogeneity is a strong assumption in the hedonic housing price context; if not analyzed conveniently it can be a potential source of specification errors. Spatial heterogeneity occurs when a territorial segmentation exists in the housing market and, therefore, either the hedonic prices associated with different attributes or the characteristics of the houses are not constant over space. The evidence of recognition of housing submarkets and the argument that caution should be exercised when interpreting the results of standard hedonic models has been identified early in the literature. Despite the argument that housing submarkets should be adopted as a working framework, some ambiguity remains about how to deal with this issue. The early empirical works on submarkets tended to be segmented into two major perspectives: those studies that adopt a supply side determinant focusing on the structural characteristics of dwellings and on neighbourhood characteristics; and those that focus on demand side determinants, such as, on household incomes or other demographic and socioeconomic characteristics. In this case the existence of distinct subgroups of demand is reflected on the territorial segmentation of the hedonic price vector. Thus, the objective of this communication is to a methodology to define housing submarkets applied at an urban area, specifically, the analysis will be applied to the urban area of Aveiro-Ã lhavo in Portugal. Demand and supply side views will be adopted and results compared to see how demand and supply interact to shape the segmentation landscape of housing markets

Suggested Citation

  • Joao Lourenço Marques & Eduardo Castro & Arnab Bhattacharjee & Paulo Batista, 2012. "SPATIAL HETEROGENEITY ACROSS SUBMARKETS: Housing submarket in an urban area of Portugal," ERSA conference papers ersa12p1111, European Regional Science Association.
  • Handle: RePEc:wiw:wiwrsa:ersa12p1111
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. João Marques & Miguel Viegas & Monique Borges & Eduardo Anselmo, 2013. "Designing the housing market for 2030 - a foresight and econometric approach," ERSA conference papers ersa13p1124, European Regional Science Association.

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