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Residential segregation and interracial economic disparities: A simultaneous-equations approach

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  • Galster, George C.

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  • Galster, George C., 1987. "Residential segregation and interracial economic disparities: A simultaneous-equations approach," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(1), pages 22-44, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:juecon:v:21:y:1987:i:1:p:22-44
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    Cited by:

    1. Bourassa, Steven C. & Hoesli, Martin & Peng, Vincent S., 2003. "Do housing submarkets really matter?," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 12(1), pages 12-28, March.
    2. Junfu Zhang, 2011. "Tipping And Residential Segregation: A Unified Schelling Model," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 51(1), pages 167-193, February.
    3. Qingfang Wang, 2010. "The Earnings Effect Of Ethnic Labour Market Concentration Under Multi-Racial Metropolitan Contexts In The United States," Tijdschrift voor Economische en Sociale Geografie, Royal Dutch Geographical Society KNAG, vol. 101(2), pages 161-176, April.
    4. Gary Painter & Lihong Yand & Zhou Yu, 2003. "Why are Chinese Homeownership Rates so high?," Working Paper 8620, USC Lusk Center for Real Estate.
    5. Joao Lourenço Marques & Eduardo Castro & Arnab Bhattacharjee & Paulo Batista, 2012. "SPATIAL HETEROGENEITY ACROSS SUBMARKETS: Housing submarket in an urban area of Portugal," ERSA conference papers ersa12p1111, European Regional Science Association.
    6. Stuart A. Gabriel & Gary D. Painter, 2011. "Household Location and Race: A Twenty-Year Retrospective," Working Paper 8512, USC Lusk Center for Real Estate.
    7. Mark Schneider & Thomas Phelan, 1993. "Black suburbanization in the 1980s," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 30(2), pages 269-279, May.
    8. Taylor, Brian D. & Ong, Paul M., 1993. "Racial and Ethnic Variations in Employment Access: An Examination of Residential Location and Commuting in Metropolitan Areas," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt3z30725t, University of California Transportation Center.
    9. David M. Frankel, 2004. "Was the Late 19th Century a Golden Age of Racial Integration?," Econometric Society 2004 North American Summer Meetings 167, Econometric Society.
    10. Zhou Yu, 2003. "Immigration and Sprawl: Race/Ethnicity, Immigrant Status, and Residential Mobility in Household Location Choice," Working Paper 8612, USC Lusk Center for Real Estate.
    11. Stephen L. Ross & George C. Galster, 2005. "Fair Housing Enforcement and Changes in Discrimination between 1989 and 2000: An Exploratory Study," Working papers 2005-16, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics.

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