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The Effect of Job Access on Black and White Youth Employment: A Cross-sectional Analysis

Author

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  • Keith R. Ihlanfeldt

    (Policy Research Program, College of Business Administration, Georgia State University, University Plaza, Atlanta, GA 30303, USA)

  • David L. Sjoquist

    (Policy Research Program, College of Business Administration, Georgia State University, University Plaza, Atlanta, GA 30303, USA)

Abstract

This paper examines the effect of access to employment opportunities on the employment probabilities of black and white youth aged 16-19 years. The empirical results, based on data from the central cities of 43 SMSAs, suggest that the nearness of jobs is an important determinant of teenager employment probability.

Suggested Citation

  • Keith R. Ihlanfeldt & David L. Sjoquist, 1991. "The Effect of Job Access on Black and White Youth Employment: A Cross-sectional Analysis," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 28(2), pages 255-265, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:sae:urbstu:v:28:y:1991:i:2:p:255-265
    DOI: 10.1080/00420989120080231
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    References listed on IDEAS

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