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Discrimination and the spatial characteristics of the urban labor market for black workers

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  • Straszheim, Mahlon R.

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  • Straszheim, Mahlon R., 1980. "Discrimination and the spatial characteristics of the urban labor market for black workers," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 7(1), pages 119-140, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:juecon:v:7:y:1980:i:1:p:119-140
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    Cited by:

    1. O'Regan, Katherine M. & Quigley, John M., 1991. "Labor market access and labor market outcomes for urban youth," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(2), pages 277-293, July.
    2. David T. Ellwood, 1983. "The Spatial Mismatch Hypothesis: Are There Teenage Jobs Missing in the Ghetto?," NBER Working Papers 1188, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Raphael, Steven, 1998. "The Spatial Mismatch Hypothesis and Black Youth Joblessness: Evidence from the San Francisco Bay Area," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(1), pages 79-111, January.
    4. Leonard, Jonathan S., 1987. "The interaction of residential segregation and employment discrimination," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(3), pages 323-346, May.
    5. Ihlanfeldt, Keith R., 1997. "Information on the Spatial Distribution of Job Opportunities within Metropolitan Areas," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(2), pages 218-242, March.
    6. Jonathan S. Leonard, 1984. "Splitting Blacks?: Affirmative Action and Earnings Inequality within and Across Races," NBER Working Papers 1327, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. J. B. Engberg & T. Kim, "undated". "Person or Place? Parametric and semiparametric estimates of intrametropolitan earnings variation," Institute for Research on Poverty Discussion Papers 1089-96, University of Wisconsin Institute for Research on Poverty.
    8. David T. Ellwood, 1986. "The Spatial Mismatch Hypothesis: Are There Teenage Jobs Missing in the Ghetto?," NBER Chapters,in: The Black Youth Employment Crisis, pages 147-190 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Taylor, Brian D. & Ong, Paul M., 1993. "Racial and Ethnic Variations in Employment Access: An Examination of Residential Location and Commuting in Metropolitan Areas," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt3z30725t, University of California Transportation Center.
    10. Emily Hoffnar & Michael Greene, 1995. "The Effect Of Relative Group Size On The Employment Prospects Of African-American And White Males," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 25(2), pages 207-218, Fall.
    11. Pinto, Santiago M., 2002. "Residential Choice, Mobility, and the Labor Market," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 51(3), pages 469-496, May.
    12. Edwin A. Sexton, 1991. "Residential Location, Workplace Location, And Black Earnings," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 21(1), pages 11-20, Spring.
    13. Weinberg, Bruce A., 2000. "Black Residential Centralization and the Spatial Mismatch Hypothesis," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 48(1), pages 110-134, July.
    14. Brueckner, Jan K. & Martin, Richard W., 1997. "Spatial mismatch: An equilibrium analysis," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(6), pages 693-714, November.

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