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The Demographic Determinants of the Demand for Black Labor

In: The Black Youth Employment Crisis

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  • George J. Borjas

Abstract

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Suggested Citation

  • George J. Borjas, 1986. "The Demographic Determinants of the Demand for Black Labor," NBER Chapters,in: The Black Youth Employment Crisis, pages 191-232 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberch:6286
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    File URL: http://www.nber.org/chapters/c6286.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Grant, James H & Hamermesh, Daniel S, 1981. "Labor Market Competition among Youths, White Women and Others," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 63(3), pages 354-360, August.
    2. Borjas, George J, 1983. "The Substitutability of Black, Hispanic, and White Labor," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 21(1), pages 93-106, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. Francine D. Blau & Lawrence M. Kahn, 2006. "The U.S. Gender Pay Gap in the 1990S: Slowing Convergence," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 60(1), pages 45-66, October.
    2. H. J. Holzer, "undated". "Employer Demand, AFDC Recipients, and Labor Market Policy," Institute for Research on Poverty Discussion Papers 1115-96, University of Wisconsin Institute for Research on Poverty.
    3. Juhn, Chinhui & Kim, Dae Il, 1999. "The Effects of Rising Female Labor Supply on Male Wages," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 17(1), pages 23-48, January.
    4. Harry J. Holzer & Paul Offner & Elaine Sorensen, 2005. "Declining employment among young black less-educated men: The role of incarceration and child support," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 24(2), pages 329-350.
    5. Daniel S. Hamermesh, 1991. "Data Difficulties in Labor Economics," NBER Chapters,in: Fifty Years of Economic Measurement: The Jubilee of the Conference on Research in Income and Wealth, pages 273-298 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Harry J. Holzer & Paul Offner, 2001. "Trends in Employment Outcomes of Young Black Men, 1979-2000," JCPR Working Papers 245, Northwestern University/University of Chicago Joint Center for Poverty Research.
    7. David M. Blau & H. Naci Mocan, 2002. "The Supply Of Quality In Child Care Centers," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 84(3), pages 483-496, August.
    8. Teresa Ghilarducci & Michael Papadopoulos & Siavash Radpour, 2017. "Relative Wages in Aging America: The Baby Boomer Effect," SCEPA working paper series. SCEPA's main areas of research are macroeconomic policy, inequality and poverty, and globalization. 2017-03, Schwartz Center for Economic Policy Analysis (SCEPA), The New School.
    9. Alberto Behar, 2005. "Does training benefit those who do not get any? Elasticities of complementarity and factor price in South Africa," Economics Series Working Papers 244, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
    10. Paul S. Davies & Michael J. Greenwood & Gary L. Hunt & Ulrich Kohli & Marta Tienda, 2012. "The local US labour market impacts of low-skilled migration from Mexico," Chapters,in: Migration Impact Assessment, chapter 2, pages 65-106 Edward Elgar Publishing.

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