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Wage Shocks and North American Labor-Market Integration

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  • Raymond Robertson

Abstract

This study uses household-level data from the United States and Mexico to examine labor-market integration. I consider how the effects of shocks and rates of convergence to an equilibrium differential are affected by borders, geography, and demographics. I find that even though a large wage differential exists between them, the labor markets of the United States and Mexico are closely integrated. Mexico's border region is more integrated with the United States than is the Mexican interior. Evidence of integration precedes the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) and may be largely the result of migration.

Suggested Citation

  • Raymond Robertson, 2000. "Wage Shocks and North American Labor-Market Integration," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(4), pages 742-764, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:aea:aecrev:v:90:y:2000:i:4:p:742-764
    Note: DOI: 10.1257/aer.90.4.742
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • F16 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Trade and Labor Market Interactions
    • F15 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Economic Integration

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