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Trends in Employment Outcomes of Young Black Men, 1979-2000

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  • Harry J. Holzer
  • Paul Offner

Abstract

We present evidence that the employment and labor force participation rates of less-educated young black men declined in the 1980?s as well as the 1990?s, despite the very strong economic conditions of the latter period. The secular decline among young black men is much stronger than among other less-educated young men, and stands in sharp contrast to the improving employment rates of young black women during the 1990?s. Trends in real wages are also considered. While several factors (such as rising school enrollment rates and the shrinkage of blue-collar jobs in the labor market) appear to have contributed to the declining employment of young black men, much of it remains unexplained at this time.

Suggested Citation

  • Harry J. Holzer & Paul Offner, 2001. "Trends in Employment Outcomes of Young Black Men, 1979-2000," JCPR Working Papers 245, Northwestern University/University of Chicago Joint Center for Poverty Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:wop:jopovw:245
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    Cited by:

    1. Seth B. Carpenter & William M. Rodgers III, 2004. "The disparate labor market impacts of monetary policy," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 23(4), pages 813-830.
    2. Kenneth Couch & Robert Fairlie, 2010. "Last hired, first fired? black-white unemployment and the business cycle," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 47(1), pages 227-247, February.

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