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International Trade, Exhaustible-Resource Abundance and Economic Growth

Author

Listed:
  • Beatrix Gaitan

    (Free University of Berlin)

  • Terry Roe

    (University of Minnesota)

Abstract

Countries with oil and other natural resources have grown less rapidly than those countries without. This phenomenon is known as the "natural resource curse". We develop an infinite-horizon, two-country model of trade in which countries are identical, except that one country is endowed with deposits of an exhaustible resource and the other is not. Within the context of the model, we show that this phenomenon can be explained in part by an inelastic demand for the exhaustible resource that increases growth in trade revenues and induces the resource-abundant country to invest relatively less than the country lacking in exhaustible resources. These results are derived analytically and illustrated by an empirical analysis based on plausible parameters obtained from data. (Copyright: Elsevier)

Suggested Citation

  • Beatrix Gaitan & Terry Roe, 2012. "International Trade, Exhaustible-Resource Abundance and Economic Growth," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 15(1), pages 72-93, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:red:issued:06-100
    DOI: 10.1016/j.red.2011.08.002
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Guilló, Maria Dolores & Perez-Sebastian, Fidel, 2015. "Neoclassical growth and the natural resource curse puzzle," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 97(2), pages 423-435.
    2. Driouchi, Ahmed, 2014. "Testing of Natural Resources as Blessing or Curse to the Knowledge Economy in Arab Countries," MPRA Paper 58598, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Tamasiga, Phemelo & Bondarev, Anton, 2014. "Differential games approach to trade with exhaustible resources," Working papers 2014/14, Faculty of Business and Economics - University of Basel.
    4. Spolador, Humberto Francisco Silva & Roe, Terry L., 2012. "The Role of Agriculture on the Recent Brazilian Economic Growth," 2012 Conference, August 18-24, 2012, Foz do Iguacu, Brazil 125822, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    5. Driouchi, Ahmed & Harkat, Tahar, 2016. "Knowledge Economy, Global Innovation Indices, Rents and Governance in Arab Economies," MPRA Paper 73507, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Humberto F.S. Spolador & Terry L. Roe, 2013. "The Role of Agriculture on the Recent Brazilian Economic Growth: How Agriculture Competes for Resources," The Developing Economies, Institute of Developing Economies, vol. 51(4), pages 333-359, December.

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