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Price Differences across Farmers’ Markets, Roadside Stands, and Supermarkets in North Carolina

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  • Natalie H. Valpiani
  • Parke E. Wilde
  • Beatrice L. Rogers
  • Hayden G. Stewart

Abstract

Whether direct farmer-to-consumer outlets compete with supermarkets on produce prices remains an empirical question; marketing costs are not consistently higher in one retail channel or the other. This study compared prices of 29 fruits and vegetables across North Carolina farmers’ markets, roadside stands, and supermarkets. Larger farmers’ markets had higher prices: three fruits and one vegetable were cheaper at a direct outlet, while four vegetables were cheaper at supermarkets. Weighting item prices by consumption share attenuated differences in mean price across outlets. Direct-retail outlets are price competitive and should be considered among other tools to boost fresh fruit and vegetable intake.

Suggested Citation

  • Natalie H. Valpiani & Parke E. Wilde & Beatrice L. Rogers & Hayden G. Stewart, 2016. "Price Differences across Farmers’ Markets, Roadside Stands, and Supermarkets in North Carolina," Applied Economic Perspectives and Policy, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 38(2), pages 276-291.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:apecpp:v:38:y:2016:i:2:p:276-291.
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1093/aepp/ppv018
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Zepeda, Lydia & Li, Jinghan, 2006. "Who Buys Local Food?," Journal of Food Distribution Research, Food Distribution Research Society, vol. 37(3), pages 1-11, November.
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    3. Dong, Diansheng & Lin, Biing-Hwan, 2009. "Fruit and Vegetable Consumption by Low-Income Americans: Would a Price Reduction Make a Difference?," Economic Research Report 55835, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    4. Lev, Larry & Gwin, Lauren, 2010. "Filling in the Gaps: Eight Things to Recognize about Farm-Direct Marketing," Choices: The Magazine of Food, Farm, and Resource Issues, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 25(1), pages 1-6.
    5. King, Robert P. & Hand, Michael S. & DiGiacomo, Gigi & Clancy, Kate & Gomez, Miguel I. & Hardesty, Shermain D. & Lev, Larry & McLaughlin, Edward W., 2010. "Comparing the Structure, Size, and Performance of Local and Mainstream Food Supply Chains," Economic Research Report 246989, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    6. Ahearn, Mary & Sterns, James, 2013. "Direct-to-Consumer Sales of Farm Products: Producers and Supply Chains in the Southeast," Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 45(3), pages 497-508, August.
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    Cited by:

    1. Stewart, Hayden & Dong, Diansheng, 2018. "How strong is the demand for food through direct-to-consumer outlets?," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 79(C), pages 35-43.

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