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The Spread of Manufacturing to the Poor Periphery 1870–2007

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Listed:
  • Agustín Bénétrix
  • Kevin O’Rourke

    ()

  • Jeffrey Williamson

Abstract

This paper documents industrial output growth around the poor periphery (Latin America, the European periphery, the Middle East and North Africa, Asia, and sub-Saharan Africa) between 1870 and 2007. We find that although the roots of rapid peripheral industrialization stretch into the late 19th century, the high point of peripheral industrialization was the 1950–1973 period, which saw widespread import-substituting industrialization. This period was also the high point of unconditional industrial catching up, defined as the tendency of less industrialized countries to post higher per capita manufacturing growth rates, and which occurred between 1920 and 1990. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media New York 2015

Suggested Citation

  • Agustín Bénétrix & Kevin O’Rourke & Jeffrey Williamson, 2015. "The Spread of Manufacturing to the Poor Periphery 1870–2007," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 26(1), pages 1-37, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:openec:v:26:y:2015:i:1:p:1-37
    DOI: 10.1007/s11079-014-9324-x
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Marc Flandreau & Jacques Le Cacheux & Frédéric Zumer, 1998. "Stability without a pact? Lessons from the European gold standard, 1880-1914," Economic Policy, CEPR;CES;MSH, vol. 13(26), pages 115-162, April.
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    Cited by:

    1. John P. Tang, 2016. "A tale of two SICs: Japanese and American industrialisation in historical perspective," Australian Economic History Review, Economic History Society of Australia and New Zealand, vol. 56(2), pages 174-197, July.
    2. Thu Dao & Frédéric Docquier & Mathilde Maurel & Pierre Schaus, 2018. "Global Migration in the 20th and 21st Centuries: the Unstoppable Force of Demography," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) hal-01743799, HAL.
    3. Tang, John P., 2015. "The Engine And The Reaper: Industrialization And Mortality In Early Modern Japan," RCESR Discussion Paper Series DP15-10, Research Center for Economic and Social Risks, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
    4. Javier Mejia, 2018. "Social Interactions and Modern Economic Growth," Documentos CEDE 016379, Universidad de los Andes - CEDE.
    5. Gerardo della Paolera & Xavier H. Duran Amorocho & Aldo Musacchio, 2018. "The Industrialization of South America Revisited: Evidence from Argentina, Brazil, Chile and Colombia, 1890-2010," NBER Working Papers 24345, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Ulaş Karakoç, 2018. "Industrial growth in interwar Egypt: first estimates, new insights," European Review of Economic History, Oxford University Press, vol. 22(1), pages 53-72.
    7. Albers, Thilo Nils Hendrik, 2018. "The prelude and global impact of the Great Depression: Evidence from a new macroeconomic dataset," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 70(C), pages 150-163.
    8. John Tang, 2016. "The engine and the reaper: The impact of industrialisation on mortality in early modern Japan," Working Papers 16015, Economic History Society.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Third world industrialization; History; N6; N1; F63; O2;

    JEL classification:

    • F1 - International Economics - - Trade
    • N7 - Economic History - - Economic History: Transport, International and Domestic Trade, Energy, and Other Services
    • O2 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Development Planning and Policy

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