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An annual index of Irish industrial production, 1800-1921

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  • Seán Kenny
  • Jason Lennard and Kevin Hjortshøj O’Rourke

Abstract

We construct an annual index of Irish industrial output for 1800-1921, the period during which the entire island was in a political Union with Great Britain. We also construct a new industrial price index. Irish industrial output grew by an average of 1.4 per cent per annum over the period as a whole, and by 1.8 per cent per annum between 1800 and the outbreak of World War I. Industrial growth was more rapid than previously thought before the Famine, and slower afterwards. While Ireland did not experience deindustrialization either before the Famine or afterwards, its industrial growth was disappointing when considered in a comparative perspective.

Suggested Citation

  • Seán Kenny & Jason Lennard and Kevin Hjortshøj O’Rourke, 2020. "An annual index of Irish industrial production, 1800-1921," Oxford Economic and Social History Working Papers _185, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:oxf:esohwp:_185
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    1. Adams, R. J. C. & Campbell, Gareth & Coyle, Christopher & Turner, John D., 2022. "The wee divergence: Business creation and political turmoil in Ireland before 1900," QUCEH Working Paper Series 2022-01, Queen's University Belfast, Queen's University Centre for Economic History.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Ireland; Industrial production; Famine; Historical national;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • E01 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - General - - - Measurement and Data on National Income and Product Accounts and Wealth; Environmental Accounts
    • N13 - Economic History - - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics; Industrial Structure; Growth; Fluctuations - - - Europe: Pre-1913
    • N14 - Economic History - - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics; Industrial Structure; Growth; Fluctuations - - - Europe: 1913-

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