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Examining Ireland"s Post--famine Economic Growth Performance

Author

Listed:
  • Frank Geary

    (University of Ulster)

  • Tom Stark

    (University of Ulster)

Abstract

This paper sets out a short--cut method for allocating country level GDP estimates across regions. Comparing UK regional GDP estimates generated using the short--cut method against existing regional GDP figures suggests that it produces acceptable results. We make estimates of GDP for the four countries of the UK for each of the census years between 1861 and 1911. Irish GDP per worker and per caput grew faster than British. These indicators demonstrate weak convergence of the two regions. The bulk of the Irish performance may be explained by traditional forces such as TFP growth and capital accumulation. Copyright Royal Economic Society 2002

Suggested Citation

  • Frank Geary & Tom Stark, 2002. "Examining Ireland"s Post--famine Economic Growth Performance," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 112(482), pages 919-935, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:ecj:econjl:v:112:y:2002:i:482:p:919-935
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    Cited by:

    1. José Aguilar-Retureta, 2014. "The GDP per capita of the Mexican regions (1895-1930): new estimates," Documentos de Trabajo (DT-AEHE) 1415, Asociacion Espa–ola de Historia Economica.
    2. Frank Geary & Tom Stark, 2015. "Regional GDP in the UK, 1861–1911: new estimates," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 68(1), pages 123-144, February.
    3. A. Bielenberg, 2008. "What happened to Irish industry after the British industrial revolution? Some evidence from the first UK Census of Production in 1907 -super-1," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 61(4), pages 820-841, November.
    4. Enflo, Kerstin & Missiaia, Anna, 2017. "Between Malthus and the industrial take-off: regional inequality in Sweden, 1571-1850," Lund Papers in Economic History 168, Lund University, Department of Economic History.
    5. Crafts, Nicholas & Mulatu, Abay, 2006. "How Did the Location of Industry Respond to Falling Transport Costs in Britain Before World War I?," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 66(03), pages 575-607, September.
    6. Emanuele Felice, 2015. "La stima e l’interpretazione dei divari regionali nel lungo periodo: i risultati principali e alcune tracce di ricerca," SCIENZE REGIONALI, FrancoAngeli Editore, vol. 2015(3), pages 91-120.
    7. Julio Martínez-Galarraga & Elisenda Paluzie & Jordi Pons & Daniel A. Tirado-Fabregat, 2008. "Agglomeration and labour productivity in Spain over the long term," Cliometrica, Journal of Historical Economics and Econometric History, Association Française de Cliométrie (AFC), vol. 2(3), pages 195-212, October.
    8. Nicholas Crafts, 2005. "Market potential in British regions, 1871-1931," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 39(9), pages 1159-1166.
    9. Marc Badia-Miró, 2015. "The evolution of the location of economic activity in Chile in the long run: a paradox of extreme concentration in absence of agglomeration economies," Estudios de Economia, University of Chile, Department of Economics, vol. 42(2 Year 20), pages 143-167, December.
    10. Julio Martínez-Galarraga, 2014. "Market potential estimates in history: a survey of methods and an application to Spain, 1867-1930," Working Papers 0051, European Historical Economics Society (EHES).
    11. Kerstin Enflo & Joan Ramón Rosés, 2015. "Coping with regional inequality in Sweden: structural change, migrations, and policy, 1860–2000," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 68(1), pages 191-217, February.
    12. Martinez-Galarraga, Julio, 2012. "The determinants of industrial location in Spain, 1856–1929," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 49(2), pages 255-275.
    13. James Foreman-Peck & Peng Zhou, 2013. "The strength and persistence of entrepreneurial cultures," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 23(1), pages 163-187, January.
    14. Alfonso Díez-Minguela & Rafael González-Val & Julio Martinez-Galarraga & M. Teresa Sanchis & Daniel A. Tirado, 2017. "The long-term relationship between economic development and regional inequality: South-West Europe, 1860-2010," Working Papers 0119, European Historical Economics Society (EHES).
    15. Emanuele Felice, 2013. "Regional income inequality in Italy in the long run (1871–2001). Patterns and determinants," UHE Working papers 2013_08, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Departament d'Economia i Història Econòmica, Unitat d'Història Econòmica.
    16. Enflo, Kerstin & Missiaia, Anna, 2017. "Regional GDP estimates for Sweden, 1571-1850," Lund Papers in Economic History 162, Lund University, Department of Economic History.
    17. Julio Martinez Galarraga & Elisenda Paluzie Hernandez & Jordi Pons Novell & Daniel Aurelio Tirado Fabregat, 2007. "Agglomeration and labour productivity in Spanish industry: a long-term analysis," Working Papers in Economics 175, Universitat de Barcelona. Espai de Recerca en Economia.
    18. Henning, Martin & Enflo, Kerstin & Andersson, Fredrik N.G., 2011. "Trends and cycles in regional economic growth," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 48(4), pages 538-555.
    19. Schulze, Max-Stephan, 2007. "Regional income dispersion and market potential in the late nineteenth century Hapsburg Empire," Economic History Working Papers 22311, London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Economic History.
    20. Sanchís Llopis, M. Teresa & Díez Minguela, Alfonso, 2018. "Regional income inequality in France : what does history teach us?," IFCS - Working Papers in Economic History.WH 26152, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid. Instituto Figuerola.
    21. repec:bla:devpol:v:35:y:2017:i:5:p:675-702 is not listed on IDEAS
    22. José Aguilar Retureta, 2016. "Explaining regional inequality from the periphery: The mexican case, 1900-2000," Documentos de Trabajo (DT-AEHE) 1608, Asociacion Espa–ola de Historia Economica.

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