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Regional GDP in the UK, 1861–1911: new estimates

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  • Frank Geary
  • Tom Stark

Abstract

type="main"> This article compares the Geary–Stark method for distributing known GDP totals across regions with a variation suggested by Crafts. Tests of the Geary–Stark method confirm that it generates accurate estimates of regional GDP. There are practical and conceptual problems with Crafts' extension, and it is not tested nor is it testable. New estimates of regional GDP for the period 1861 to 1911 contradict Crafts's suggestion of rising regional inequality. Purchasing power parity adjustments do not alter this trend. The new estimates confirm Ireland's post-Famine catch-up. The great bulk of Irish labour productivity growth can be accounted for by an upward shifting production function, though it can be argued that that portion of growth that represents catch-up may be attributable to labour force decline.

Suggested Citation

  • Frank Geary & Tom Stark, 2015. "Regional GDP in the UK, 1861–1911: new estimates," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 68(1), pages 123-144, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ehsrev:v:68:y:2015:i:1:p:123-144
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/1468-0289.12061
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Liam Brunt & Edmund Cannon, 2004. "The Irish grain trade from the Famine to the First World War," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 57(1), pages 33-79, February.
    2. Williamson Jeffrey G., 1995. "The Evolution of Global Labor Markets since 1830: Background Evidence and Hypotheses," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 32(2), pages 141-196, April.
    3. Nicholas Crafts, 2005. "Regional Gdp In Britain, 1871–1911: Some Estimates," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 52(1), pages 54-64, February.
    4. Richard Johnston & Martin McKinney & Tom Stark, 1996. "Regional Price Level Variations and Real Household Incomes in the United Kingdom, 1979/80-1993," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 30(6), pages 567-578.
    5. Frank Geary & Tom Stark, 2002. "Examining Ireland"s Post--famine Economic Growth Performance," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 112(482), pages 919-935, October.
    6. Kravis, Irving B & Heston, Alan W & Summers, Robert, 1978. "Real GDP per Capita for More Than One Hundred Countries," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 88(350), pages 215-242, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Fredrik N G Andersson & Jason Lennard, 2019. "Irish GDP between the Famine and the First World War: estimates based on a dynamic factor model," European Review of Economic History, Oxford University Press, vol. 23(1), pages 50-71.
    2. Daniel A. Tirado Fabregat & Alfonso Díez-Minguela & Julio Martínez-Galarraga, 2015. "A closer look at the long-term patterns of regional income inequality in Spain: The poor stay poor (and stay together)," Working Papers. Serie EC 2015-05, Instituto Valenciano de Investigaciones Económicas, S.A. (Ivie).
    3. Emanuele Felice, 2015. "La stima e l’interpretazione dei divari regionali nel lungo periodo: i risultati principali e alcune tracce di ricerca," SCIENZE REGIONALI, FrancoAngeli Editore, vol. 2015(3), pages 91-120.
    4. repec:bla:ehsrev:v:71:y:2018:i:4:p:1249-1269 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Alfonso Díez-Minguela & Rafael González-Val & Julio Martinez-Galarraga & M. Teresa Sanchis & Daniel A. Tirado, 2017. "The long-term relationship between economic development and regional inequality: South-West Europe, 1860-2010," Working Papers 0119, European Historical Economics Society (EHES).

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