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Regional Gdp In Britain, 1871-1911: Some Estimates

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  • Nicholas Crafts

Abstract

The paper builds on a method proposed by Geary and Stark for estimating regional incomes in Victorian Britain. This is modified by using tax data to allocate non-wage income across regions. The results suggest that the coefficient of variation of regional GDP per head was rising rapidly prior to World War I in similar fashion to the late 20th century such that its level in 1901 and 2001 was about the same. In both episodes of globalization there were big winners and big losers among British regions. Copyright (c) Scottish Economic Society 2005.

Suggested Citation

  • Nicholas Crafts, 2005. "Regional Gdp In Britain, 1871-1911: Some Estimates," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 52(1), pages 54-64, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:scotjp:v:52:y:2005:i:1:p:54-64
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    File URL: http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.0036-9292.2005.00334.x
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Michael D. Bordo & Barry Eichengreen & Douglas A. Irwin, 1999. "Is Globalization Today Really Different than Globalization a Hunderd Years Ago?," NBER Working Papers 7195, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    Cited by:

    1. Agust Arnorsson & Gylfi Zoega, 2016. "On the Causes of Brexit," CESifo Working Paper Series 6056, CESifo Group Munich.
    2. Jean-Pascal Bassino & Kyoji Fukao & Ralph Paprzycki & Tokihiko Settsu & Tangjun Yuan, 2010. "Regional Inequality and Industrial Structures in Pre-War Japan: An Analysis Based on New Prefectural GDP Estimates," Global COE Hi-Stat Discussion Paper Series gd10-138, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
    3. Frank Geary & Tom Stark, 2015. "Regional GDP in the UK, 1861–1911: new estimates," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 68(1), pages 123-144, February.
    4. Ruta Gentvilaite & Astrid Kander & Paul Warde, 2014. "The Role of Energy Quality in Shaping Long-Term Energy Intensity in Europe," Energies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 8(1), pages 1-21, December.
    5. Daniel A. Tirado Fabregat & Alfonso Díez-Minguela & Julio Martínez-Galarraga, 2015. "A closer look at the long-term patterns of regional income inequality in Spain: The poor stay poor (and stay together)," Working Papers. Serie EC 2015-05, Instituto Valenciano de Investigaciones Económicas, S.A. (Ivie).
    6. Ciccarelli, Carlo & Missiaia, Anna, 2014. "Business fluctuations in Imperial Austria's regions, 1867-1913: new evidence," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 55963, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    7. Felice, Emanuele & Vecchi, Giovanni, 2015. "Italy’s Modern Economic Growth, 1861–2011," Enterprise & Society, Cambridge University Press, vol. 16(02), pages 225-248, June.
    8. Marc Badia-Miró, 2015. "The evolution of the location of economic activity in Chile in the long run: a paradox of extreme concentration in absence of agglomeration economies," Estudios de Economia, University of Chile, Department of Economics, vol. 42(2 Year 20), pages 143-167, December.
    9. Agust Arnorsson & Gylfi Zoega, 2016. "On the Causes of Brexit," Birkbeck Working Papers in Economics and Finance 1605, Birkbeck, Department of Economics, Mathematics & Statistics.
    10. Julio Martínez-Galarraga, 2014. "Market potential estimates in history: a survey of methods and an application to Spain, 1867-1930," Working Papers 0051, European Historical Economics Society (EHES).
    11. Kerstin Enflo & Joan Ramón Rosés, 2015. "Coping with regional inequality in Sweden: structural change, migrations, and policy, 1860–2000," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 68(1), pages 191-217, February.
    12. Alfonso Díez-Minguela & Rafael González-Val & Julio Martinez-Galarraga & M. Teresa Sanchis & Daniel A. Tirado, 2017. "The long-term relationship between economic development and regional inequality: South-West Europe, 1860-2010," Working Papers 0119, European Historical Economics Society (EHES).
    13. Emanuele Felice, 2011. "The Rule and the Exception: Italy’s Regional Imbalances (1891-2001) through a Shift-Share Analysis," QA - Rivista dell'Associazione Rossi-Doria, Associazione Rossi Doria, issue 4, December.
    14. José Aguilar-Retureta, 2015. "Regional income distribution in Mexico: new long-term evidence, 1895-2010," UB Economics Working Papers 2015/323, Universitat de Barcelona, Facultat d'Economia i Empresa, UB Economics.
    15. Martin Eriksson, 2011. "The Challenges of Including Political Economy Research in Regional Economic History," ERSA conference papers ersa10p1642, European Regional Science Association.
    16. Leunig, Timothy, 2006. "Time is Money: A Re-Assessment of the Passenger Social Savings from Victorian British Railways," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 66(03), pages 635-673, September.
    17. Enflo, Kerstin, 2014. "Finland’s regional GDPs 1880-2010: estimates, sources and interpretations," Lund Papers in Economic History 135, Lund University, Department of Economic History.
    18. Markus Lampe & Paul Sharp, 2014. "Greasing the wheels of rural transformation? Margarine and the competition for the British butter market," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 67(3), pages 769-792, August.
    19. Henning, Martin & Enflo, Kerstin & Andersson, Fredrik N.G., 2011. "Trends and cycles in regional economic growth," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 48(4), pages 538-555.
    20. Schulze, Max-Stephan, 2007. "Regional income dispersion and market potential in the late nineteenth century Hapsburg Empire," Economic History Working Papers 22311, London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Economic History.
    21. Braggion, F., 2008. "Managers, Firms and (Secret) Social Networks : The Economics of Freemasonry," Discussion Paper 2008-36, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.
    22. José Aguilar Retureta, 2016. "Explaining regional inequality from the periphery: The mexican case, 1900-2000," Documentos de Trabajo (DT-AEHE) 1608, Asociacion Espa–ola de Historia Economica.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • N23 - Economic History - - Financial Markets and Institutions - - - Europe: Pre-1913
    • R11 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Regional Economic Activity: Growth, Development, Environmental Issues, and Changes

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