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Seasonal Nonlinear Long Memory Model for the US Inflation Rates

  • Ahdi Ajmi


  • Adnen Ben Nasr


  • Mohamed Boutahar


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Article provided by Society for Computational Economics in its journal Computational Economics.

Volume (Year): 31 (2008)
Issue (Month): 3 (April)
Pages: 243-254

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Handle: RePEc:kap:compec:v:31:y:2008:i:3:p:243-254
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  1. Franses, Philip Hans & Paap, Richard, 1999. "Does Seasonality Influence the Dating of Business Cycle Turning Points?," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 21(1), pages 79-92, January.
  2. Mohamed Safouane Ben Aissa & Mohamed Boutahar & Jamel Jouini, 2004. "Bai and Perron's and spectral density methods for structural change detection in the US inflation process," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 11(2), pages 109-115.
  3. van Dijk, D.J.C. & Strikholm, B. & Terasvirta, T., 2001. "The effects of institutional and technological change and business cycle fluctiations on seasonal patterns in quarterly industrial production series," Econometric Institute Research Papers EI 2001-12, Erasmus University Rotterdam, Erasmus School of Economics (ESE), Econometric Institute.
  4. Warne Anders & Vredin Anders, 2006. "Unemployment and Inflation Regimes," Studies in Nonlinear Dynamics & Econometrics, De Gruyter, vol. 10(2), pages 1-52, May.
  5. Franses, Philip Hans, 1996. "Periodicity and Stochastic Trends in Economic Time Series," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198774549.
  6. Garcia, R. & Perron, P., 1990. "An Anlysis Of The Real Interest Rate Under Regime Shifts," Papers 353, Princeton, Department of Economics - Econometric Research Program.
  7. Hassler, Uwe & Wolters, Jurgen, 1995. "Long Memory in Inflation Rates: International Evidence," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 13(1), pages 37-45, January.
  8. Jeffrey A. Miron & J. Joseph Beaulieu, 1995. "What Have Macroeconomists Learned about Business Cycles from the Study of Seasonal Cycles?," NBER Working Papers 5258, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  9. Eitrheim, Øyvind & Teräsvirta, Timo, 1995. "Testing the Adequacy of Smooth Transition Autoregressive Models," SSE/EFI Working Paper Series in Economics and Finance 56, Stockholm School of Economics.
  10. Baillie, Richard T., 1996. "Long memory processes and fractional integration in econometrics," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 73(1), pages 5-59, July.
  11. repec:cup:cbooks:9780521562607 is not listed on IDEAS
  12. Canova, Fabio & Ghysels, Eric, 1994. "Changes in seasonal patterns : Are they cyclical?," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 18(6), pages 1143-1171, November.
  13. repec:cup:cbooks:9780521565882 is not listed on IDEAS
  14. Granger, Clive W J, 1993. "Strategies for Modelling Nonlinear Time-Series Relationships," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 69(206), pages 233-38, September.
  15. Martin D.D. Evans & Karen K. Lewis, 1993. "Do Expected Shifts in Inflation Affect Estimates of the Long-Run Fisher Relation?," Working Papers 93-06, New York University, Leonard N. Stern School of Business, Department of Economics.
  16. Franses, Philip Hans & Ooms, Marius, 1997. "A periodic long-memory model for quarterly UK inflation," International Journal of Forecasting, Elsevier, vol. 13(1), pages 117-126, March.
  17. Josu Arteche & Peter M. Robinson, 1998. "Seasonal and cyclical long memory," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 2241, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  18. Franses, Ph.H.B.F. & de Bruin, P. & van Dijk, D.J.C., 2000. "Seasonal smooth transition autoregression," Econometric Institute Research Papers EI 2000-06/A, Erasmus University Rotterdam, Erasmus School of Economics (ESE), Econometric Institute.
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