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Sind betriebliche Bündnisse für Arbeit erfolgreich? / Are ln-plant Alliances for Job Security Successful?

  • Hübler Olaf

    ()

    (Empirische Wirtschaftsforschung, insb. Ökonometrie, Universität Hannover, Germany)

This paper uses data from the WSI works council survey in 2003 where detailed information on agreements between employers and employees to secure jobs are available. Firm size and profit effects of company-level agreements are investigated. A major result is that the development of firm size is less favourable in companies with in-plant alliances than in other firms. Interestingly, this result is stronger within the group of successful firms. If we distinguish between several measures our estimation shows that training on-the-job and prolongation of working hours are positively correlated with the objective of job security while pay cuts, reduction of working hours and reorganisation of firms lead to further lay-offs. More ambiguous is the impact of working hours accounts. Our investigations demonstrate that the agreements are more successful if employers or the management suggest an in-plant alliance than works councils or unions. Usually, we observe only short run positive employment effects but in the medium term the effects are negative. Only in the long run the development turns around and in-plant alliances are really successful. Sometimes, renegotiations can help to improve the situation.

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File URL: http://www.degruyter.com/view/j/jbnst.2005.225.issue-6/jbnst-2005-0605/jbnst-2005-0605.xml?format=INT
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Article provided by De Gruyter in its journal Journal of Economics and Statistics (Jahrbuecher fuer Nationaloekonomie und Statistik).

Volume (Year): 225 (2005)
Issue (Month): 6 (December)
Pages: 630-652

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Handle: RePEc:jns:jbstat:v:225:y:2005:i:6:p:630-652
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  1. O Blanchard & A Landier, 2002. "The Perverse Effects of Partial Labour Market Reform: fixed--Term Contracts in France," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 112(480), pages F214-F244, June.
  2. Sandra E. Black & Lisa M. Lynch, 1997. "How to Compete: The Impact of Workplace Practices and Information Technology on Productivity," NBER Working Papers 6120, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Kapteyn, Arie & Kalwij, Adriaan & Zaidi, Asghar, 2004. "The myth of worksharing," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 11(3), pages 293-313, June.
  4. Wolfgang Hardle & Oliver Linton, 1994. "Applied Nonparametric Methods," Cowles Foundation Discussion Papers 1069, Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University.
  5. Olivier Blanchard & Justin Wolfers, 1999. "The Role of Shocks and Institutions in the Rise of European Unemployment: The Aggregate Evidence," NBER Working Papers 7282, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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