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Deconstructing Attitudes towards Immigrant Workers among Hungarian Employees and Higher Education Students

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  • Krisztina Dajnoki

    (Institute of Management and Organization Sciences, Faculty of Economics and Business, University of Debrecen, 4028 Debrecen, Hungary)

  • Domician Máté

    (Institute of Accounting and Finance, Faculty of Economics and Business, University of Debrecen, 4028 Debrecen, Hungary)

  • Veronika Fenyves

    (Institute of Accounting and Finance, Faculty of Economics and Business, University of Debrecen, 4028 Debrecen, Hungary)

  • András István Kun

    (Institute of Management and Organization Sciences, Faculty of Economics and Business, University of Debrecen, 4028 Debrecen, Hungary)

Abstract

To preserve economic and social sustainability, countries impacted by international migration must prepare for the challenges that influx will bring to their societies, whether it be to their labor markets or their local, regional and national cultures. In essence, all areas of public life may be affected. Therefore, the exploration and recognition of the factors influencing integration, as well as the correlations behind attitudes of acceptance or rejection of the integration of immigrants, are essential. The present study contributes to the results in this field by revealing the beliefs behind the differences between groups accepting and rejecting immigrants, using a questionnaire database. Our survey sample consists of 444 Hungarian university students and 170 employees. The primary method of data analysis is binary logistic regression, completed by bivariate analyses. Our findings confirm that a positive, accepting attitude towards immigrants is more probable if an image is formed of them as being hardworking and that the work they do contributes to the economic development of the host country. Moreover, the integration of such individuals should not be seen as resulting in any unfavorable change in criminal statistics, working conditions, unemployment or discrimination. Additionally, the acceptance of immigrants as colleagues might be facilitated—in addition to their higher qualifications—by domestic (i.e., Hungarian) employees being better informed about immigration, and if immigrants occupy positions in which domestic employees are not willing to work.

Suggested Citation

  • Krisztina Dajnoki & Domician Máté & Veronika Fenyves & András István Kun, 2017. "Deconstructing Attitudes towards Immigrant Workers among Hungarian Employees and Higher Education Students," Sustainability, MDPI, vol. 9(9), pages 1-28, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:gam:jsusta:v:9:y:2017:i:9:p:1639-:d:112120
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    2. KOVÁCS Edit Veronika & HARANGI-RÁKOS Mónika, 2020. "Cities Vs The Countryside €“ Pros And Cons Of Urban And Rural Life," Annals of Faculty of Economics, University of Oradea, Faculty of Economics, vol. 1(1), pages 530-539, July.
    3. Yana SELIVERSTOVA & Anita PIEROG, 2021. "A Theoretical Study On Global Workforce Diversity Management, Its Benefits And Challenges," CrossCultural Management Journal, Fundația Română pentru Inteligența Afacerii, Editorial Department, issue 1, pages 117-124, July.

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