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Public attitudes toward immigration—Determinants and unknowns

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  • Mohsen Javdani

    (University of British Columbia (Okanagan Campus), Canada)

Abstract

Public attitudes toward immigration play an important role in influencing immigration policy and immigrants’ integration experience. This highlights the importance of a systematic examination of these public attitudes and their underlying drivers. Evidence increasingly suggests that while a majority of individuals favor restrictive immigration policies, particularly against ethnically different immigrants, there exists significant variation in these public views by country, education, age, and so on. In addition, sociopsychological factors play a significantly more important role than economic concerns in driving these public attitudes and differences.

Suggested Citation

  • Mohsen Javdani, 2020. "Public attitudes toward immigration—Determinants and unknowns," IZA World of Labor, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA), pages 473-473, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izawol:journl:2020:n:473
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    immigration; public attitudes; economic concerns; sociopsychological factors;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J18 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Public Policy
    • J7 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Discrimination
    • D01 - Microeconomics - - General - - - Microeconomic Behavior: Underlying Principles

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