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Public Preferences on Immigration in Japan

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  • Toshihiro Okubo

    (Faculity of Economics, Keio University)

Abstract

This paper examines the factors affecting Japanese attitudes toward immigration. Using individual-level survey data, we investigate the impact of both economic/socioeconomic (cognitive) and noneconomic (or noncognitive) factors, the latter including behavioral bias, communication skills, social stance and subjective well-being. The results indicate that individualsthat are male, richer, more educated, younger and from smaller families tend to agree with immigration. More importantly, noneconomic factors also matter, with those that have lower time preference, better English language skills and overseas experience tending to be more positive to the perception of immigration. In addition, individuals trusting neighborhoods rather than the government, that make donations to society and that keep in good health tend to be more positive toward immigration.

Suggested Citation

  • Toshihiro Okubo, 2021. "Public Preferences on Immigration in Japan," Keio-IES Discussion Paper Series 2021-005, Institute for Economics Studies, Keio University.
  • Handle: RePEc:keo:dpaper:2021-005
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Immigration; Non-cognitive factors; Household Survey; Japan;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • F16 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Trade and Labor Market Interactions
    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration

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