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Heterogeneity in Informal Salaried Employment: Evidence from the Egyptian Labor Market Survey

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  • Radchenko, Natalia

Abstract

This paper contributes to the continuing debates on the mechanisms driving labor market informality in developing countries by proposing an innovative way to discriminate between segmented and competitive markets. An empirical analysis is applied to Egyptian paid employment in the highly dynamic context of 1998–2006.

Suggested Citation

  • Radchenko, Natalia, 2014. "Heterogeneity in Informal Salaried Employment: Evidence from the Egyptian Labor Market Survey," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 62(C), pages 169-188.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:wdevel:v:62:y:2014:i:c:p:169-188
    DOI: 10.1016/j.worlddev.2014.05.007
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. repec:oup:oxecpp:v:70:y:2018:i:1:p:47-72. is not listed on IDEAS
    2. repec:bla:agecon:v:49:y:2018:i:1:p:131-143 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Elsayed, Ahmed & Wahba, Jackline, 2017. "Political Change and Informality: Evidence from the Arab Spring," IZA Discussion Papers 11245, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    4. Sahoo, Bimal & Neog, Bhaskar Jyoti, 2015. "Heterogeneity and participation in Informal employment among non-cultivator workers in India," MPRA Paper 68136, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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