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Food Security, Gender, and Occupational Choice among Urban Low-Income Households

  • Floro, Maria Sagrario
  • Bali Swain, Ranjula

This paper examines an adaptive strategy using occupational choice that can be undertaken by household members in urban poor areas to help ensure their access to food. Our investigation focuses on self-employed women and men in 14 predominantly slum communities in Bolivia, Ecuador, Philippines, and Thailand. Results of our empirical analysis show that choice of business is associated with household vulnerability to food insecurity, with women in vulnerable households likely to engage in food enterprises. The findings suggest that urban low-income households can mitigate the risk of food shortage through the selection of an enterprise activity that earns money income and is a direct source of food for consumption.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal World Development.

Volume (Year): 42 (2013)
Issue (Month): C ()
Pages: 89-99

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Handle: RePEc:eee:wdevel:v:42:y:2013:i:c:p:89-99
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/worlddev

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  1. Mark Montgomery & Paul Hewett, 2005. "Urban poverty and health in developing countries: Household and neighborhood Effects," Demography, Springer, vol. 42(3), pages 397-425, August.
  2. Maxwell, Daniel G., 1996. "Measuring food insecurity: the frequency and severity of "coping strategies"," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 21(3), pages 291-303, July.
  3. Haddad, Lawrence & Kennedy, Eileen & Sullivan, Joan, 1994. "Choice of indicators for food security and nutrition monitoring," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 19(3), pages 329-343, June.
  4. Alfonso Miranda & Sophia Rabe-Hesketh, 2006. "Maximum likelihood estimation of endogenous switching and sample selection models for binary, ordinal, and count variables," Stata Journal, StataCorp LP, vol. 6(3), pages 285-308, September.
  5. Maria Sagrario Floro & John Messier, 2011. "Is there a link between quality of employment and indebtedness? the case of urban low-income households in Ecuador," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 35(3), pages 499-526.
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  7. Levin, Carol E. & Ruel, Marie T. & Morris, Saul S. & Maxwell, Daniel G. & Armar-Klemesu, Margaret & Ahiadeke, Clement, 1999. "Working Women in an Urban Setting: Traders, Vendors and Food Security in Accra," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 27(11), pages 1977-1991, November.
  8. Levin, Carol E. & Maxwell, Daniel G. & Armar-Klemesu, Margaret & Ruel, Marie T. & Morris, Saul Sutkover & Ahiadeke, Clement., 1999. "Working women in an urban setting," FCND discussion papers 66, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  9. Philip Amis & Carole Rakodi, 1994. "Urban poverty: Issues for research and policy," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 6(5), pages 627-634, 09.
  10. Ruel, Marie T. & Haddad, Lawrence & Garrett, James L., 1999. "Some Urban Facts of Life: Implications for Research and Policy," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 27(11), pages 1917-1938, November.
  11. Funkhouser, Edward, 1996. "The urban informal sector in Central America: Household survey evidence," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 24(11), pages 1737-1751, November.
  12. David KUCERA & Leanne RONCOLATO, 2008. "Informal employment: Two contested policy issues," International Labour Review, International Labour Organization, vol. 147(4), pages 321-348, December.
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  14. Garrett, James L. & Ruel, Marie T., 1999. "Are determinants of rural and urban food security and nutritional status different?," FCND discussion papers 65, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  15. Greg Hundley, 2000. "Male/female earnings differences in self-employment: The effects of marriage, children, and the household division of labor," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 54(1), pages 95-114, October.
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