IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/oup/cambje/v35y2011i3p499-526.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Is there a link between quality of employment and indebtedness? the case of urban low-income households in Ecuador

Author

Listed:
  • Maria Sagrario Floro
  • John Messier

Abstract

The paper explores the incidence of high indebtedness or financial stress among urban, poor households in Ecuador and demonstrates its relation with the quality of employment. We argue that informalisation of employment, and in particular job precariousness, have consequences on other dimensions of vulnerability such as high debt servicing and financial stress. The empirical analysis is based on a 2002 sample survey data of men and women workers in urban poor communities of Ecuador. By employing an index of job quality, we investigate and compare the job quality of women and men workers in these households and find gender-based patterns with women working in relatively low quality jobs compared to men. Moreover, there seems to be differentiated levels of debt servicing among women and men that suggests uneven debt burden sharing among household members. By means of regression analyses, the paper demonstrates that low quality jobs tend to lead to higher debt servicing. The results provide a nuanced and illuminating picture of the interconnectedness of employment, financial stress and vulnerability. Copyright The Author 2010. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Cambridge Political Economy Society. All rights reserved., Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Maria Sagrario Floro & John Messier, 2011. "Is there a link between quality of employment and indebtedness? the case of urban low-income households in Ecuador," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 35(3), pages 499-526.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:cambje:v:35:y:2011:i:3:p:499-526
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1093/cje/beq034
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. repec:eee:touman:v:51:y:2015:i:c:p:234-246 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Floro, Maria Sagrario & Bali Swain, Ranjula, 2013. "Food Security, Gender, and Occupational Choice among Urban Low-Income Households," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 89-99.
    3. Deguilhem, Thibaud & Berrou, Jean-Philippe & Combarnous, Fran├žois, 2017. "Using your ties to get a worse job? The differential effects of social networks on quality of employment: Evidence from Colombia," MPRA Paper 78628, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:oup:cambje:v:35:y:2011:i:3:p:499-526. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Oxford University Press) or (Christopher F. Baum). General contact details of provider: https://academic.oup.com/cje .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.