IDEAS home Printed from
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article or follow this journal

The Spatial Interdependence of FDI in Latin America

  • Blanco, Luisa R.
Registered author(s):

    Using a sample of 17 Latin American countries, with observations during 1986–2006, two forms of spatial interdependence of foreign direct investment (FDI) are explored: (1) surrounding market potential, and (2) spatial autocorrelation. We find that surrounding market potential has a positive significant effect on net FDI, but there is no evidence that FDI is spatially autocorrelated. Other factors that show a significant positive effect on FDI include control of corruption and exports of raw materials. When considering only FDI inflows from the US, we find that FDI is spatially autocorrelated, and that surrounding market potential is not significant.

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

    File URL:
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal World Development.

    Volume (Year): 40 (2012)
    Issue (Month): 7 ()
    Pages: 1337-1351

    in new window

    Handle: RePEc:eee:wdevel:v:40:y:2012:i:7:p:1337-1351
    Contact details of provider: Web page:

    References listed on IDEAS
    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

    as in new window
    1. Bengoa, Marta & Sanchez-Robles, Blanca, 2003. "Foreign direct investment, economic freedom and growth: new evidence from Latin America," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 19(3), pages 529-545, September.
    2. Campos, Nauro F & Kinoshita, Yuko, 2008. "Foreign Direct Investment and Structural Reforms: Evidence from Eastern Europe and Latin America," CEPR Discussion Papers 6690, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    3. Li, Quan & Resnick, Adam, 2003. "Reversal of Fortunes: Democratic Institutions and Foreign Direct Investment Inflows to Developing Countries," International Organization, Cambridge University Press, vol. 57(01), pages 175-211, December.
    4. Blonigen, Bruce A. & Davies, Ronald B. & Waddell, Glen R. & Naughton, Helen T., 2007. "FDI in space: Spatial autoregressive relationships in foreign direct investment," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 51(5), pages 1303-1325, July.
    5. J. Barkley Rosser, 2009. "Introduction," Chapters, in: Handbook of Research on Complexity, chapter 1 Edward Elgar.
    6. Bruce Blonigen, 2005. "A Review of the Empirical Literature on FDI Determinants," Atlantic Economic Journal, International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 33(4), pages 383-403, December.
    7. Chinn, Menzie D. & Ito, Hiro, 2006. "What matters for financial development? Capital controls, institutions, and interactions," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 81(1), pages 163-192, October.
    8. Branstetter, Lee, 2006. "Is foreign direct investment a channel of knowledge spillovers? Evidence from Japan's FDI in the United States," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(2), pages 325-344, March.
    9. Reinhart, Carmen & Calvo, Guillermo & Leiderman, Leonardo, 1993. "“Capital Inflows and Real Exchange Rate Appreciation in Latin America: The Role of External Factors," MPRA Paper 7125, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    10. Benhua Yang, 2007. "Autocracy, Democracy, and FDI Inflows to the Developing Countries," International Economic Journal, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 21(3), pages 419-439.
    11. Henry Louie & Donald Rousslang, 2008. "Host-country governance, tax treaties and US direct investment abroad," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer, vol. 15(3), pages 256-273, June.
    12. Albuquerque, Rui & Loayza, Norman & Serven, Luis, 2003. "World market integration through the lens of foreign direct investors," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3060, The World Bank.
    13. Isabel Ruiz & Susan Pozo, 2008. "Exchange rates and US direct investment into Latin America," The Journal of International Trade & Economic Development, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 17(3), pages 411-438.
    14. Henrik Hansen & John Rand, 2004. "On the Causal Links between FDI and Growth in Developing Countries," Discussion Papers 04-30, University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics.
    15. Cravino, Javier & Lederman, Daniel & Olarreaga, Marcelo, 2007. "Foreign direct investment in Latin America during the emergence of China and India : stylized facts," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4360, The World Bank.
    16. Albert Wijeweera & Brian Dollery, 2009. "Host country corruption level and Foreign Direct Investments inflows," International Journal of Trade and Global Markets, Inderscience Enterprises Ltd, vol. 2(2), pages 168-178.
    17. Elizabeth Asiedu, 2006. "Foreign Direct Investment in Africa: The Role of Natural Resources, Market Size, Government Policy, Institutions and Political Instability," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 29(1), pages 63-77, 01.
    18. Abdur Chowdhury & George Mavrotas, 2006. "FDI and Growth: What Causes What?," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 29(1), pages 9-19, 01.
    19. Tomáš Havránek & Zuzana Iršová, 2010. "Which Foreigners Are Worth Wooing? A Meta-Analysis of Vertical Spillovers from FDI," Working Papers IES 2010/16, Charles University Prague, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute of Economic Studies, revised Aug 2010.
    20. Jo Jakobsen & Indra de Soysa, 2006. "Do Foreign Investors Punish Democracy? Theory and Empirics, 1984-2001," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 59(3), pages 383-410, 08.
    21. Blomström, Magnus & Kokko, Ari, 2003. "Human Capital and Inward FDI," EIJS Working Paper Series 167, The European Institute of Japanese Studies.
    22. Kevin Sylwester, 2005. "Foreign direct investment, growth and income inequality in less developed countries," International Review of Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 19(3), pages 289-300.
    23. Rossitza B. Wooster & David S. Diebel, 2010. "Productivity Spillovers from Foreign Direct Investment in Developing Countries: A Meta-Regression Analysis," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 14(s1), pages 640-655, 08.
    24. Asiedu, Elizabeth & Lien, Donald, 2004. "Capital Controls and Foreign Direct Investment," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 32(3), pages 479-490, March.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:wdevel:v:40:y:2012:i:7:p:1337-1351. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Zhang, Lei)

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.