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Gender pairing bias in trustworthiness

  • Bonein, Aurélie
  • Serra, Daniel

We experimentally examine whether partner's gender information influences trust and trustworthiness behavior. We conduct an experiment where subjects make their choices, first with a completely unknown partner and then a partner of known gender (or vice versa). We find limited influence for gender information on trust behavior. Conversely, the results show a strong gender interaction with regard to trustworthiness both at the aggregate and individual levels. The proportion returned is significantly larger when the trustor and the trustee are of the same gender, bringing into light a gender pairing bias in trustworthiness.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics).

Volume (Year): 38 (2009)
Issue (Month): 5 (October)
Pages: 779-789

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Handle: RePEc:eee:soceco:v:38:y:2009:i:5:p:779-789
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/620175

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