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Do the Reciprocal Trust Less?

Author

Listed:
  • Altmann, Steffen

    () (University of Copenhagen)

  • Dohmen, Thomas

    () (University of Bonn and IZA)

  • Wibral, Matthias

    () (Maastricht University)

Abstract

We study the intrapersonal relationship between trust and reciprocity in a laboratory experiment. Reciprocal subjects trust significantly more than selfish ones. This finding raises questions about theories of social preferences which predict that “fairer” players should trust less.

Suggested Citation

  • Altmann, Steffen & Dohmen, Thomas & Wibral, Matthias, 2007. "Do the Reciprocal Trust Less?," IZA Discussion Papers 3010, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp3010
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Ernst Fehr & Klaus M. Schmidt, 1999. "A Theory of Fairness, Competition, and Cooperation," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 114(3), pages 817-868.
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    8. Bohnet, Iris & Zeckhauser, Richard, 2004. "Trust, risk and betrayal," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 55(4), pages 467-484, December.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    laboratory experiment; reciprocity; fairness; trust; social preferences;

    JEL classification:

    • C91 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Laboratory, Individual Behavior
    • D63 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Equity, Justice, Inequality, and Other Normative Criteria and Measurement

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