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Gender and the social costs of claiming value: An experimental approach

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  • Greig, Fiona

Abstract

This paper employs economic experiments to explore the social costs of claiming value in distributive negotiations. I use a reverse dictator game, a "Taking" game, to measure value claiming behavior and an Investment game to measure the social costs of claiming value in terms of trust offered by third parties to Takers. I observe social costs to claiming value and find that male Trustors impose higher social costs than female Trustors. Women reduce how much value they claim in the presence of social costs, but men do not. Takers anticipate this response and claim less when observed by a man.

Suggested Citation

  • Greig, Fiona, 2010. "Gender and the social costs of claiming value: An experimental approach," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 76(3), pages 549-562, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jeborg:v:76:y:2010:i:3:p:549-562
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. A lose-lose proposition: what's really happening when women negotiate
      by Mara Olekalns, Professor of Management - Negotiations at Melbourne Business School in The Conversation on 2012-04-11 01:59:10

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    Cited by:

    1. Ece Yagman & Malcolm Keswell, 2015. "Accents, Race and Discrimination: Evidence from a Trust Game," SALDRU Working Papers 158, Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit, University of Cape Town.

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