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Education and its effects on income and mortality of men aged sixty-five and over in Great Britain

Listed author(s):
  • Dorsett, Richard
  • Lui, Silvia
  • Weale, Martin

We explore the effects of income and, additionally education on the income, self-reported health and survival of men aged sixty-five and over in Great Britain . By so doing, we identify benefits of education which are omitted in the conventional analysis with its focus on labour income excluding employers' pension contributions. We find that income at age sixty-five is significantly influenced by educational attainment and has a significant effect on survival. Even after controlling for circumstances at age sixty-five or when first observed, we identify benefits discounted to age sixty-five of £115,000 for men with higher education qualifications as compared to those with minimal qualifications.

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File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0927537114000189
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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Labour Economics.

Volume (Year): 27 (2014)
Issue (Month): C ()
Pages: 71-82

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Handle: RePEc:eee:labeco:v:27:y:2014:i:c:p:71-82
DOI: 10.1016/j.labeco.2014.02.002
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/labeco

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