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Silvia Sze Wai Lui

Personal Details

First Name:Silvia Sze Wai
Middle Name:
Last Name:Lui
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:plu186
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]

Affiliation

National Institute of Economic and Social Research (NIESR)

London, United Kingdom
http://www.niesr.ac.uk/

: +44 (020) 7222 7665
+44 (020) 7654 1900
2 Dean Trench Street, Smith Square, London SW1P 3HE
RePEc:edi:niesruk (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Dr Silvia Lui & Dr Martin Weale, 2012. "The Trade-off between Income and Smoking as Influences on Mortality: Evidence from the British Household Panel Survey for Men and Women aged Sixty-five and Over," National Institute of Economic and Social Research (NIESR) Discussion Papers 395, National Institute of Economic and Social Research.
  2. Dr Silvia Lui & Dr Martin Weale, 2012. "Education and its Effects on Survival, Income and Health of those aged Sixty-five and over in the United Kingdom," National Institute of Economic and Social Research (NIESR) Discussion Papers 393, National Institute of Economic and Social Research.
  3. Dr Silvia Lui & Dr Martin Weale, 2011. "Education and its Effects on the Income, Health and Survival of those aged Sixty-five and Over (This paper has been revised and is replaced by DP 393)," National Institute of Economic and Social Research (NIESR) Discussion Papers 383, National Institute of Economic and Social Research.
  4. Dr Silvia Lui & Dr Martin Weale & Dr. James Mitchell, 2011. "Mortality in the British Panel Household Survey: a Test of a Standard Treatment for Non-Response," National Institute of Economic and Social Research (NIESR) Discussion Papers 384, National Institute of Economic and Social Research.
  5. Dr Richard Dorsett & Dr Silvia Lui & Dr Martin Weale, 2010. "Economic Benefits of Lifelong Learning," National Institute of Economic and Social Research (NIESR) Discussion Papers 352, National Institute of Economic and Social Research.
  6. Dr Silvia Lui & Dr Martin Weale & Dr. James Mitchell, 2009. "Collective Sentiment in Qualitative Business Surveys," National Institute of Economic and Social Research (NIESR) Discussion Papers 328, National Institute of Economic and Social Research.
  7. Dr Silvia Lui & Dr Martin Weale & Dr. James Mitchell, 2009. "The utility of expectational data: Firm-level evidence using matched qualitative-quantitative UK surveys," National Institute of Economic and Social Research (NIESR) Discussion Papers 343, National Institute of Economic and Social Research.
  8. Dr Silvia Lui & Dr Martin Weale & Dr. James Mitchell, 2008. "Qualitative Business Surveys: Signal or Noise?," National Institute of Economic and Social Research (NIESR) Discussion Papers 323, National Institute of Economic and Social Research.

Articles

  1. Dorsett, Richard & Lui, Silvia & Weale, Martin, 2014. "Education and its effects on income and mortality of men aged sixty-five and over in Great Britain," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(C), pages 71-82.
  2. Silvia Lui & James Mitchell & Martin Weale, 2011. "Qualitative business surveys: signal or noise?," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 174(2), pages 327-348, April.
  3. Lui, Silvia & Mitchell, James & Weale, Martin, 2011. "The utility of expectational data: Firm-level evidence using matched qualitative-quantitative UK surveys," International Journal of Forecasting, Elsevier, vol. 27(4), pages 1128-1146, October.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Dr Richard Dorsett & Dr Silvia Lui & Dr Martin Weale, 2010. "Economic Benefits of Lifelong Learning," National Institute of Economic and Social Research (NIESR) Discussion Papers 352, National Institute of Economic and Social Research.

    Cited by:

    1. Blanden, Jo & Buscha, Franz & Sturgis, Patrick & Urwin, Peter, 2012. "Measuring the earnings returns to lifelong learning in the UK," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 31(4), pages 501-514.

  2. Dr Silvia Lui & Dr Martin Weale & Dr. James Mitchell, 2009. "The utility of expectational data: Firm-level evidence using matched qualitative-quantitative UK surveys," National Institute of Economic and Social Research (NIESR) Discussion Papers 343, National Institute of Economic and Social Research.

    Cited by:

    1. Lahiri, Kajal & Zhao, Yongchen, 2015. "Quantifying survey expectations: A critical review and generalization of the Carlson–Parkin method," International Journal of Forecasting, Elsevier, vol. 31(1), pages 51-62.
    2. Oscar Claveria & Enric Monte & Salvador Torra, 2018. "A Data-Driven Approach to Construct Survey-Based Indicators by Means of Evolutionary Algorithms," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 135(1), pages 1-14, January.
    3. Oscar Claveria & Enric Monte & Salvador Torra, 2017. "“Let the data do the talking: Empirical modelling of survey-based expectations by means of genetic programming”," AQR Working Papers 201706, University of Barcelona, Regional Quantitative Analysis Group, revised May 2017.
    4. Oscar Claveria & Enric Monte & Salvador Torra, 2015. "“Self-organizing map analysis of agents’ expectations. Different patterns of anticipation of the 2008 financial crisis”," AQR Working Papers 201508, University of Barcelona, Regional Quantitative Analysis Group, revised Mar 2015.
    5. Kjetil Martinsen & Francesco Ravazzolo & Fredrik Wulfsberg, 2011. "Forecasting macroeconomic variables using disaggregate survey data," Working Paper 2011/04, Norges Bank.
    6. Kajal Lahiri & Yongchen Zhao, 2013. "Quantifying Heterogeneous Survey Expectations: The Carlson-Parkin Method Revisited," Discussion Papers 13-08, University at Albany, SUNY, Department of Economics.
    7. Puah, Chin-Hong & Wong, Shirly Siew-Ling & Habibullah, Muzafar Shah, 2012. "Rationality of business operational forecasts: evidence from Malaysian distributive trade sector," MPRA Paper 37599, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Oscar Claveria & Enric Monte & Salvador Torra, 2018. "“Tracking economic growth by evolving expectations via genetic programming: A two-step approach”," IREA Working Papers 201801, University of Barcelona, Research Institute of Applied Economics, revised Jan 2018.
    9. Breitung, Jörg & Schmeling, Maik, 2011. "Quantifying survey expectations: What's wrong with the probability approach?," Hannover Economic Papers (HEP) dp-485, Leibniz Universität Hannover, Wirtschaftswissenschaftliche Fakultät.
    10. Guizzardi, Andrea & Stacchini, Annalisa, 2015. "Real-time forecasting regional tourism with business sentiment surveys," Tourism Management, Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 213-223.

  3. Dr Silvia Lui & Dr Martin Weale & Dr. James Mitchell, 2008. "Qualitative Business Surveys: Signal or Noise?," National Institute of Economic and Social Research (NIESR) Discussion Papers 323, National Institute of Economic and Social Research.

    Cited by:

    1. Lahiri, Kajal & Zhao, Yongchen, 2015. "Quantifying survey expectations: A critical review and generalization of the Carlson–Parkin method," International Journal of Forecasting, Elsevier, vol. 31(1), pages 51-62.
    2. Oscar Claveria & Enric Monte & Salvador Torra, 2018. "A Data-Driven Approach to Construct Survey-Based Indicators by Means of Evolutionary Algorithms," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 135(1), pages 1-14, January.
    3. Oscar Claveria & Enric Monte & Salvador Torra, 2017. "“Let the data do the talking: Empirical modelling of survey-based expectations by means of genetic programming”," AQR Working Papers 201706, University of Barcelona, Regional Quantitative Analysis Group, revised May 2017.
    4. Rüdiger Bachmann & Steffen Elstner, 2013. "Firms' Optimism and Pessimism," NBER Working Papers 18989, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Daniel Kaufmann & Rolf Scheufele, 2015. "Business tendency surveys and macroeconomic fluctuations," KOF Working papers 15-378, KOF Swiss Economic Institute, ETH Zurich.
    6. Kjetil Martinsen & Francesco Ravazzolo & Fredrik Wulfsberg, 2011. "Forecasting macroeconomic variables using disaggregate survey data," Working Paper 2011/04, Norges Bank.
    7. Michele Caivano & Andrew Harvey, 2014. "Time-series models with an EGB2 conditional distribution," Journal of Time Series Analysis, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 35(6), pages 558-571, November.
    8. Kajal Lahiri & Yongchen Zhao, 2013. "Quantifying Heterogeneous Survey Expectations: The Carlson-Parkin Method Revisited," Discussion Papers 13-08, University at Albany, SUNY, Department of Economics.
    9. Oscar Claveria & Enric Monte & Salvador Torra, 2018. "“Tracking economic growth by evolving expectations via genetic programming: A two-step approach”," IREA Working Papers 201801, University of Barcelona, Research Institute of Applied Economics, revised Jan 2018.
    10. Breitung, Jörg & Schmeling, Maik, 2011. "Quantifying survey expectations: What's wrong with the probability approach?," Hannover Economic Papers (HEP) dp-485, Leibniz Universität Hannover, Wirtschaftswissenschaftliche Fakultät.
    11. Guizzardi, Andrea & Stacchini, Annalisa, 2015. "Real-time forecasting regional tourism with business sentiment surveys," Tourism Management, Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 213-223.

Articles

  1. Silvia Lui & James Mitchell & Martin Weale, 2011. "Qualitative business surveys: signal or noise?," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 174(2), pages 327-348, April.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  2. Lui, Silvia & Mitchell, James & Weale, Martin, 2011. "The utility of expectational data: Firm-level evidence using matched qualitative-quantitative UK surveys," International Journal of Forecasting, Elsevier, vol. 27(4), pages 1128-1146, October.
    See citations under working paper version above.Sorry, no citations of articles recorded.

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