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The British Household Panel Survey and its Income Data


  • Jenkins, Stephen P.

    () (London School of Economics)


This paper provides a self-contained introduction to the British Household Panel Survey (BHPS), concentrating on aspects relevant to analysis of the distribution of household income. I discuss BHPS design features and how data on net household income are derived. The BHPS net household income definition is modelled on that used in Britain’s official personal income distribution statistics (Households Below Average Income, HBAI). I show that cross-sectional BHPS distributions track corresponding HBAI ones relatively well over time.

Suggested Citation

  • Jenkins, Stephen P., 2010. "The British Household Panel Survey and its Income Data," IZA Discussion Papers 5242, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp5242

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    Cited by:

    1. Stephen P. Jenkins & Philippe Van Kerm, 2016. "Assessing Individual Income Growth," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 83(332), pages 679-703, October.
    2. Spyridon Lazarakis & James Malley & Konstantinos Angelopoulos, 2017. "Asymmetries in Earnings, Employment and Wage Risk in Great Britain," 2017 Meeting Papers 1314, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    3. Anita Ratcliffe, 2015. "Wealth Effects, Local Area Attributes, and Economic Prospects: On the Relationship between House Prices and Mental Wellbeing," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 61(1), pages 75-92, March.
    4. Jenkins, Stephen P. & Van Kerm, Philippe, 2011. "Trends in individual income growth: measurement methods and British evidence," ISER Working Paper Series 2011-06, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    5. Colin P. Green & John S. Heywood, 2016. "Don't Forget the Gravy! Are Bonuses Just Added on Top of Salaries?," Industrial Relations: A Journal of Economy and Society, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 55(3), pages 490-513, July.
    6. Foverskov, Else & Holm, Anders, 2016. "Socioeconomic inequality in health in the British household panel: Tests of the social causation, health selection and the indirect selection hypothesis using dynamic fixed effects panel models," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 150(C), pages 172-183.
    7. Haywood, Luke, 2016. "Wealth effects on job preferences," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 1-11.
    8. Reeves, Aaron & McKee, Martin & Mackenbach, Johan & Whitehead, Margaret & Stuckler, David, 2017. "Introduction of a national minimum wage reduceddepressive symptoms in low-wage workers:a quasi-natural experiment in the UK," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 66485, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    9. Colin Green & John Heywood, 2012. "Don't Forget the Gravy! Are Bonuses and Time Rates Complements?," Working Papers 13424023, Lancaster University Management School, Economics Department.
    10. Etheridge, Ben, 2015. "A test of the household income process using consumption and wealth data," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 78(C), pages 129-157.
    11. Dr Silvia Lui & Dr Martin Weale, 2012. "Education and its Effects on Survival, Income and Health of those aged Sixty-five and over in the United Kingdom," National Institute of Economic and Social Research (NIESR) Discussion Papers 393, National Institute of Economic and Social Research.
    12. Dorsett, Richard & Lui, Silvia & Weale, Martin, 2014. "Education and its effects on income and mortality of men aged sixty-five and over in Great Britain," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(C), pages 71-82.
    13. Dr Silvia Lui & Dr Martin Weale, 2011. "Education and its Effects on the Income, Health and Survival of those aged Sixty-five and Over (This paper has been revised and is replaced by DP 393)," National Institute of Economic and Social Research (NIESR) Discussion Papers 383, National Institute of Economic and Social Research.

    More about this item


    British Household Panel Survey; household income; net income; disposable income; Households Below Average Income; income distribution; inequality; poverty;

    JEL classification:

    • C81 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Data Collection and Data Estimation Methodology; Computer Programs - - - Methodology for Collecting, Estimating, and Organizing Microeconomic Data; Data Access
    • D31 - Microeconomics - - Distribution - - - Personal Income and Wealth Distribution
    • I32 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Measurement and Analysis of Poverty

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