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The British Household Panel Survey and its income data

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  • Jenkins, Stephen P.

Abstract

This paper provides a self-contained introduction to the British Household Panel Survey (BHPS), concentrating on aspects relevant to analysis of the distribution of household income. I discuss BHPS design features and how data on net household income are derived. The BHPS net household income definition is modelled on that used in Britain’s official personal income distribution statistics (Households Below Average Income, HBAI). I show that cross-sectional BHPS distributions track corresponding HBAI ones relatively well over time.

Suggested Citation

  • Jenkins, Stephen P., 2010. "The British Household Panel Survey and its income data," ISER Working Paper Series 2010-33, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:ese:iserwp:2010-33
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    File URL: https://www.iser.essex.ac.uk/research/publications/working-papers/iser/2010-33.pdf
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    Cited by:

    1. Spyridon Lazarakis & James Malley & Konstantinos Angelopoulos, 2017. "Asymmetries in Earnings, Employment and Wage Risk in Great Britain," 2017 Meeting Papers 1314, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    2. Colin Green & John Heywood, 2012. "Don't Forget the Gravy! Are Bonuses and Time Rates Complements?," Working Papers 13424023, Lancaster University Management School, Economics Department.
    3. Dr Silvia Lui & Dr Martin Weale, 2011. "Education and its Effects on the Income, Health and Survival of those aged Sixty-five and Over (This paper has been revised and is replaced by DP 393)," National Institute of Economic and Social Research (NIESR) Discussion Papers 383, National Institute of Economic and Social Research.
    4. Jenkins, Stephen P. & Van Kerm, Philippe, 2011. "Trends in individual income growth: measurement methods and British evidence," ISER Working Paper Series 2011-06, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    5. Stephen P. Jenkins & Philippe Van Kerm, 2016. "Assessing Individual Income Growth," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 83(332), pages 679-703, October.
    6. Haywood, Luke, 2016. "Wealth Effects on Job Preferences," EconStor Open Access Articles, ZBW - German National Library of Economics, pages 1-11.
    7. Dr Silvia Lui & Dr Martin Weale, 2012. "Education and its Effects on Survival, Income and Health of those aged Sixty-five and over in the United Kingdom," National Institute of Economic and Social Research (NIESR) Discussion Papers 393, National Institute of Economic and Social Research.
    8. Etheridge, Ben, 2015. "A test of the household income process using consumption and wealth data," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 78(C), pages 129-157.
    9. Dorsett, Richard & Lui, Silvia & Weale, Martin, 2014. "Education and its effects on income and mortality of men aged sixty-five and over in Great Britain," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(C), pages 71-82.
    10. Colin P. Green & John S. Heywood, 2016. "Don't Forget the Gravy! Are Bonuses Just Added on Top of Salaries?," Industrial Relations: A Journal of Economy and Society, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 55(3), pages 490-513, July.
    11. Anita Ratcliffe, 2015. "Wealth Effects, Local Area Attributes, and Economic Prospects: On the Relationship between House Prices and Mental Wellbeing," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 61(1), pages 75-92, March.
    12. Foverskov, Else & Holm, Anders, 2016. "Socioeconomic inequality in health in the British household panel: Tests of the social causation, health selection and the indirect selection hypothesis using dynamic fixed effects panel models," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 150(C), pages 172-183.
    13. Reeves, Aaron & McKee, Martin & Mackenbach, Johan & Whitehead, Margaret & Stuckler, David, 2017. "Introduction of a national minimum wage reduceddepressive symptoms in low-wage workers:a quasi-natural experiment in the UK," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 66485, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • C81 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Data Collection and Data Estimation Methodology; Computer Programs - - - Methodology for Collecting, Estimating, and Organizing Microeconomic Data; Data Access
    • D31 - Microeconomics - - Distribution - - - Personal Income and Wealth Distribution
    • I32 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Measurement and Analysis of Poverty

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