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The political economy of housing prices: Hedonic pricing with regression discontinuity

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  • Sue, Eddie D.W.
  • Wong, Wei-Kang

Abstract

This paper uses hedonic pricing to empirically estimate the value of publicly provided local goods and services in the constituencies of the ruling party relative to those of the opposition parties. To improve control for omitted variables that change smoothly over space, we use a regression discontinuity design to restrict the sample to houses that are near the electoral boundaries. Using resale market prices of public flats in Singapore, in some cases we find a moderate but highly statistically significant difference in housing prices across the electoral boundaries that separate the constituencies of the ruling party and the opposition parties.

Suggested Citation

  • Sue, Eddie D.W. & Wong, Wei-Kang, 2010. "The political economy of housing prices: Hedonic pricing with regression discontinuity," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(2), pages 133-144, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jhouse:v:19:y:2010:i:2:p:133-144
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Martin Bohl & Winfried Michels & Jens Oelgemöller, 2012. "Determinanten von Wohnimmobilienpreisen: Das Beispiel der Stadt Münster," Review of Regional Research: Jahrbuch für Regionalwissenschaft, Springer;Gesellschaft für Regionalforschung (GfR), vol. 32(2), pages 193-208, September.
    2. Liao, Wen-Chi & Wang, Xizhu, 2012. "Hedonic house prices and spatial quantile regression," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(1), pages 16-27.
    3. Belcher, Richard N. & Chisholm, Ryan A., 2018. "Tropical Vegetation and Residential Property Value: A Hedonic Pricing Analysis in Singapore," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 149(C), pages 149-159.
    4. Uwamariya, Beatrice, 2014. "Assessment of Consumer Awareness and Preferences for Quality Certification and Origin-Labeling in Fruit Salads in Kigali,Rwanda," Research Theses 198512, Collaborative Masters Program in Agricultural and Applied Economics.

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