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Teaching new markets old tricks: The effects of subsidized investment on low-income neighborhoods

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  • Freedman, Matthew

Abstract

This paper examines the effects of investment subsidized by the federal government's New Markets Tax Credit (NMTC) program, which provides tax incentives to encourage private investment in low-income neighborhoods. I identify the impacts of the program by taking advantage of a discontinuity in the rule determining the eligibility of census tracts for NMTC-subsidized investment. Using this discontinuity as a source of quasi-experimental variation in commercial development across tracts, I find that subsidized investment has modest positive effects on neighborhood conditions in low-income communities. Though spillovers appear to be small and crowd out incomplete, the results suggest that some of the observed impacts on neighborhoods are attributable to changes in the composition of residents as opposed to improvements in the welfare of existing residents.

Suggested Citation

  • Freedman, Matthew, 2012. "Teaching new markets old tricks: The effects of subsidized investment on low-income neighborhoods," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 96(11), pages 1000-1014.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:pubeco:v:96:y:2012:i:11:p:1000-1014
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jpubeco.2012.07.006
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Felipe Berrutti, 2016. "Subsidios a la oferta y decisiones de localización: El caso de la Ley de Vivienda de Interés Social," Documentos de Investigación Estudiantil (students working papers) 16-02, Instituto de Economía - IECON.
    2. Matthew Freedman, 2013. "Targeted Business Incentives and Local Labor Markets," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 48(2), pages 311-344.
    3. Wenhua Di & Daniel L. Millimet, 2017. "Targeted business incentives and the debt behavior of households," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 52(3), pages 1115-1142, May.
    4. Li Zhou, 2014. "Commercial Revitalization In Low-Income Urban Communities: The Holdup Problem And Urban Development Policy," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 32(3), pages 545-559, July.
    5. Neumark, David & Simpson, Helen, 2015. "Place-Based Policies," Handbook of Regional and Urban Economics, Elsevier.
    6. Patrick Kline & Enrico Moretti, 2014. "People, Places, and Public Policy: Some Simple Welfare Economics of Local Economic Development Programs," Annual Review of Economics, Annual Reviews, vol. 6(1), pages 629-662, August.
    7. Sachiko Kazekami, 2016. "Incidence, Optimal Use and Rationale of Place-Based Job Creation Programs," SERIES 02-2016, Dipartimento di Economia e Finanza - Università degli Studi di Bari "Aldo Moro", revised Mar 2016.
    8. Faggio, G., 2016. "Relocation of Public Sector Workers: Evaluating a place-based policy," Working Papers 16/10, Department of Economics, City University London.
    9. Matthew Freedman & Annemarie Kuhns, 2017. "Supply-Side Subsidies to Improve Food Access and Dietary Outcomes: Evidence from the New Markets Tax Credit," Working Papers 171804, University of California-Irvine, Department of Economics.
    10. Kaitlyn R. Harger & Amanda Ross & Heather M. Stephens, 2015. "What Matters More for Economic Development, the Amount of Funding or the Number of Projects Funded? Evidence from the Community Development Financial Investment Fund," Working Papers 15-51, Department of Economics, West Virginia University.
    11. Sachiko Kazekami, 2017. "Evaluating place-based job creation programs in Japan," IZA Journal of Labor Policy, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 6(1), pages 1-27, December.
    12. Giulia Faggio, 2014. "Relocation of Public Sector Workers: Evaluating a Place-based Policy," SERC Discussion Papers 0155, Spatial Economics Research Centre, LSE.
    13. Amanda Ross & Kaitlyn Wolf, 2014. "Do Market-Based Tax Incentives Attract New Businesses? Evidence from the New Markets Tax Credit," ERSA conference papers ersa14p653, European Regional Science Association.
    14. Tong, Patricia & Zhou, Li, 2014. "The Impact of Place-Based Employment Tax Credits on Local Labor: Evidence from Tax Data," Working Papers 2014-6, University of Alberta, Department of Economics.
    15. Freedman, Matthew, 2015. "Place-based programs and the geographic dispersion of employment," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 53(C), pages 1-19.
    16. Kaitlyn Harger & Amanda Ross, 2014. "Do Capital Tax Incentives Attract New Businesses? Evidence across Industries from the New Markets Tax Credit," Working Papers 14-14, Department of Economics, West Virginia University.

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