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The new markets tax credit program: a midcourse assessment

Author

Listed:
  • Rubin, Julia Sass

    () (Rutgers School of Planning and Public Policy)

  • Stankiewicz, Gregory M.

Abstract

Two leading scholars of community development analyze the New Markets Tax Credit (NMTC) program’s origins in the economic boom of the 1990s and its implementation in a much different economic and political environment after 2000. The authors examine the program’s successes and failures and discuss prospects for improvement.

Suggested Citation

  • Rubin, Julia Sass & Stankiewicz, Gregory M., 2005. "The new markets tax credit program: a midcourse assessment," Community Development Investment Review, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, issue 1, pages 1-11.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedfcr:y:2005:p:1-11:n:v.1no.1
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    File URL: http://www.frbsf.org/publications/community/review/122005/article1.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Galster, George, 2002. "An economic efficiency analysis of deconcentrating poverty populations," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 11(4), pages 303-329, December.
    2. George A. Akerlof, 1980. "A Theory of Social Custom, of which Unemployment may be One Consequence," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 94(4), pages 749-775.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Julia Sass Rubin, 2009. "Shifting ground: Can community development loan funds continue to serve the neediest borrowers?," Community Development Investment Center Working Paper 2009-01, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco.
    2. Kaitlyn R. Harger & Amanda Ross & Heather M. Stephens, 2015. "What Matters More for Economic Development, the Amount of Funding or the Number of Projects Funded? Evidence from the Community Development Financial Investment Fund," Working Papers 15-51, Department of Economics, West Virginia University.
    3. Amanda Ross & Kaitlyn Wolf, 2014. "Do Market-Based Tax Incentives Attract New Businesses? Evidence from the New Markets Tax Credit," ERSA conference papers ersa14p653, European Regional Science Association.
    4. Freedman, Matthew, 2012. "Teaching new markets old tricks: The effects of subsidized investment on low-income neighborhoods," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 96(11), pages 1000-1014.
    5. Kaitlyn Harger & Amanda Ross, 2014. "Do Capital Tax Incentives Attract New Businesses? Evidence across Industries from the New Markets Tax Credit," Working Papers 14-14, Department of Economics, West Virginia University.

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