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Child care workers' wages: New evidence on returns to education, experience, job tenure and auspice

Author

Listed:
  • Gordon H. Cleveland

    () (Division of Management, University of Toronto at Scarborough, 1265 Military Trail, Scarborough, Ontario, Canada. M1C 1A4)

  • Douglas E. Hyatt

    () (Centre for Industrial Relations, University of Toronto, 121 St. George Street, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. M5S 2E8)

Abstract

Child care workers receive low hourly pay, modest returns to education, experience and job tenure, and have high rates of turnover. These stylized facts have caused analysts to characterize child care workers as secondary labour market participants. We use Canadian data to challenge this characterization and to examine the disputed effects of auspice (non-profit vs. for-profit status) on wages. In contrast to Mocan and Viola (1997), improved controls for the differential availability of resources and firm size do not make the positive wage effects experienced by workers in non-profit day care centres disappear.

Suggested Citation

  • Gordon H. Cleveland & Douglas E. Hyatt, 2002. "Child care workers' wages: New evidence on returns to education, experience, job tenure and auspice," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 15(3), pages 575-597.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:jopoec:v:15:y:2002:i:3:p:575-597
    Note: Received: 7 February 2000/Accepted: 1 August 2001
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Roche, Kristen, 2013. "Reconciling gender differences in the returns to education in self-employment: Does occupation matter?," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 112-119.
    2. Forer, Barry & Hertzman, Clyde & Kohen, Dafna, 2006. "Ensembles de donnees nationales : sources d'information sur la garde des enfants au Canada," Direction des etudes analytiques : documents de recherche 2006284f, Statistics Canada, Direction des etudes analytiques.
    3. Powers Elizabeth T & Powers Nicholas J, 2010. "Causes of Caregiver Turnover and the Potential Effectiveness of Wage Subsidies for Solving the Long-Term Care Workforce 'Crisis'," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 10(1), pages 1-30, January.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Child care · non-profit · compensation;

    JEL classification:

    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • J42 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Particular Labor Markets - - - Monopsony; Segmented Labor Markets

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