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How do individuals deal with victimization and victimization risk? Longitudinal evidence from Mexico

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  • Braakmann, Nils

Abstract

This paper uses variation in victimization probabilities and past victimization between individuals living in the same community to shed new light on the costs of crime. I use panel data from the Mexican Family Life Survey for 2002 and 2005 and look at the impact of within-community differences in victimization risk on changes in (avoidance) behavior and time-allocation. My results from fixed effects and instrumental variable estimations point towards a number of behavioral changes, including individuals arming themselves, with marked gender differences in the reactions of individuals. Crime victims also suffer from sleep deprivation indicating welfare losses.

Suggested Citation

  • Braakmann, Nils, 2012. "How do individuals deal with victimization and victimization risk? Longitudinal evidence from Mexico," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 84(1), pages 335-344.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jeborg:v:84:y:2012:i:1:p:335-344
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jebo.2012.04.001
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Braakmann, Nils, 2013. "Crime, health and wellbeing – Longitudinal evidence from Mexico," MPRA Paper 44885, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Cheng, Zhiming & Smyth, Russell, 2015. "Crime victimization, neighborhood safety and happiness in China," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 424-435.
    3. Braakmann, Nils, 2012. "The link between non-property crime and house prices – Evidence from UK street-level data," MPRA Paper 44884, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Janke, K. & Propper, C. & Shields, M.A., 2013. "Does Violent Crime Deter Physical Activity?," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 13/26, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
    5. Nicola Mastrorocco & Luigi Minale, 2016. "Information and Crime Perceptions: Evidence from a Natural Experiment," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 1601, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
    6. Mueller, Valerie & Billings, Lucy & Mogues, Tewodaj & Peterman, Amber & Wineman, Ayala, 2015. "Filling the legal void? Experimental evidence from a community-based legal aid program for gender-equal land rights in Tanzania:," IFPRI discussion papers 1434, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    7. Depew, Briggs & Swensen, Isaac D., 2016. "The Decision to Carry: The Effect of Crime on Concealed-Carry Applications," IZA Discussion Papers 10236, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Cost of crime; Victimization; Avoidance behavior; Dwelling protection;

    JEL classification:

    • H40 - Public Economics - - Publicly Provided Goods - - - General
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • K00 - Law and Economics - - General - - - General (including Data Sources and Description)
    • K42 - Law and Economics - - Legal Procedure, the Legal System, and Illegal Behavior - - - Illegal Behavior and the Enforcement of Law
    • R23 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Regional Migration; Regional Labor Markets; Population

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