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Risk preference dynamics around life events

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  • Kettlewell, Nathan

Abstract

Using a panel of Australians I estimate the dynamic relationship between common life events and risk preferences. Changes in financial circumstances, parenthood and family loss predict changes in risk preferences. Importantly the effects are largest closer to the event date and disappear over time. This supports a model of preference formation where risk preferences are (trend) stable but fluctuations are at least partly deterministic. The linkages between life events and risk preferences are explored. There is little evidence that changes in consumption, state dependence, or changes in mental health and mood explain the results. However, emotional stability is an influential moderator suggesting that emotions play an important role.

Suggested Citation

  • Kettlewell, Nathan, 2019. "Risk preference dynamics around life events," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 162(C), pages 66-84.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jeborg:v:162:y:2019:i:c:p:66-84
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jebo.2019.04.018
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    Cited by:

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    3. Nolan, Anne & Whelan, Adele & McGuinness, Seamus & Maître, Bertrand, 2019. "Gender, pensions and income in retirement," Research Series, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI), number RS87, December.
    4. Kettlewell, Nathan, 2020. "Subjective Expectations for Health Service Use and Consequences for Health Insurance Behavior," IZA Discussion Papers 13445, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    5. Buchmueller, Thomas C. & Cheng, Terence C. & Pham, Ngoc T.A. & Staub, Kevin E., 2021. "The effect of income-based mandates on the demand for private hospital insurance and its dynamics," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 75(C).
    6. Innocenti, Stefania & Clark, Gordon L. & McGill, Sarah & Cuñado, Juncal, 2019. "The effect of past health events on intentions to purchase insurance: Evidence from 11 countries," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 74(C).

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Risk preferences; Life events; Dynamics; Fixed effects ordered logit;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D01 - Microeconomics - - General - - - Microeconomic Behavior: Underlying Principles
    • D81 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Criteria for Decision-Making under Risk and Uncertainty
    • D91 - Microeconomics - - Micro-Based Behavioral Economics - - - Role and Effects of Psychological, Emotional, Social, and Cognitive Factors on Decision Making

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