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Informing policy makers about future health spending: A comparative analysis of forecasting methods in OECD countries

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  • Astolfi, Roberto
  • Lorenzoni, Luca
  • Oderkirk, Jillian

Abstract

Concerns about health care expenditure growth and its long-term sustainability have risen to the top of the policy agenda in many OECD countries. As continued growth in spending places pressure on government budgets, health services provision and patients’ personal finances, policy makers have launched forecasting projects to support policy planning. This comparative analysis reviewed 25 models that were developed for policy analysis in OECD countries by governments, research agencies, academics and international organisations.

Suggested Citation

  • Astolfi, Roberto & Lorenzoni, Luca & Oderkirk, Jillian, 2012. "Informing policy makers about future health spending: A comparative analysis of forecasting methods in OECD countries," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 107(1), pages 1-10.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:hepoli:v:107:y:2012:i:1:p:1-10
    DOI: 10.1016/j.healthpol.2012.05.001
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Vincenzo Rebba, 2014. "The Long-Term Sustainability Of European Health Care Systems," "Marco Fanno" Working Papers 0191, Dipartimento di Scienze Economiche "Marco Fanno".
    2. Del Vecchio, Mario & Fenech, Lorenzo & Prenestini, Anna, 2015. "Private health care expenditure and quality in Beveridge systems: Cross-regional differences in the Italian NHS," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 119(3), pages 356-366.

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