IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/fth/brichs/20008.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Age, Costs of Acute and Long-term Care and Proximity to Death: Evidence for 1987-88 and 1994-94 in Btitish Columbia

Author

Listed:
  • McGrail, K.
  • Green, B.
  • Barer, M.L.
  • Evans, R.G.
  • Hertzman, C.

Abstract

Age is less important than proximity to death as a predictor of costs. However, the pattern of social and nursing care costs is different from that for acute medical care. In planning services it is important to take into account the relatively larger impact of aging on social and nursing care than on acute care.

Suggested Citation

  • McGrail, K. & Green, B. & Barer, M.L. & Evans, R.G. & Hertzman, C., 2000. "Age, Costs of Acute and Long-term Care and Proximity to Death: Evidence for 1987-88 and 1994-94 in Btitish Columbia," Centre for Health Services and Policy Research 2000:8, University of British Columbia - Centre for Health Services and Policy Research..
  • Handle: RePEc:fth:brichs:2000:8
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    To our knowledge, this item is not available for download. To find whether it is available, there are three options:
    1. Check below whether another version of this item is available online.
    2. Check on the provider's web page whether it is in fact available.
    3. Perform a search for a similarly titled item that would be available.

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Gustavo Mery & Walter P. Wodchis & Audrey Laporte, 2016. "The determinants of the propensity to receive publicly funded home care services for the elderly in Canada: a panel two-stage residual inclusion approach," Health Economics Review, Springer, vol. 6(1), pages 1-18, December.
    2. Claudia Geue & Andrew Briggs & James Lewsey & Paula Lorgelly, 2014. "Population ageing and healthcare expenditure projections: new evidence from a time to death approach," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 15(8), pages 885-896, November.
    3. Murphy, Michael & Martikainen, Pekka, 2013. "Use of hospital and long-term institutional care services in relation to proximity to death among older people in Finland," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 88(C), pages 39-47.
    4. Schulz, Erika & Leidl, Reiner & Konig, Hans-Helmut, 2004. "The impact of ageing on hospital care and long-term care--the example of Germany," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 67(1), pages 57-74, January.
    5. repec:eee:socmed:v:184:y:2017:i:c:p:1-14 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Rolden, Herbert J.A. & van Bodegom, David & Westendorp, Rudi G.J., 2014. "Variation in the costs of dying and the role of different health services, socio-demographic characteristics, and preceding health care expenses," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 120(C), pages 110-117.
    7. Polder, Johan J. & Barendregt, Jan J. & van Oers, Hans, 2006. "Health care costs in the last year of life--The Dutch experience," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 63(7), pages 1720-1731, October.
    8. Payne, Greg & Laporte, Audrey & Foot, David K. & Coyte, Peter C., 2009. "Temporal trends in the relative cost of dying: Evidence from Canada," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 90(2-3), pages 270-276, May.
    9. Patrick Moore & Kathleen Bennett & Charles Normand, 2014. "The Importance of Proximity to Death in Modelling Community Medication Expenditures for Older People: Evidence From New Zealand," Applied Health Economics and Health Policy, Springer, vol. 12(6), pages 623-633, December.
    10. Astolfi, Roberto & Lorenzoni, Luca & Oderkirk, Jillian, 2012. "Informing policy makers about future health spending: A comparative analysis of forecasting methods in OECD countries," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 107(1), pages 1-10.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    AGEING ; POPULATION ; HEALTH SERVICES;

    JEL classification:

    • I10 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - General
    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • I11 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Analysis of Health Care Markets

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:fth:brichs:2000:8. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Thomas Krichel). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.