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Impacts of Advances in Medical Technology in Australia

Author

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  • Productivity Commission

Abstract

the Productivity Commission research report into the ‘Impacts of Advances in Medical Technology in Australia’ was released on 20 September 2005. The report responds to a request from the Australian Government to examine the impact of advances in medical technology on public and private healthcare expenditure, and the associated costs and benefits for the Australian community. Advances in medical technology have brought large benefits to the Australian community, but at the same time have been major drivers of the recent increase in healthcare spending. These trends are set to continue, with future technological advances likely to support further dramatic improvements in healthcare, but also to raise expenditure significantly. While it is likely that the benefits of advances in medical technology have outweighed the additional costs, the Commission found that the cost effectiveness of individual technologies varies widely and for some is not known. The report also highlights a number of procedural and coverage gaps in Australia’s health technology assessment processes. The report concludes that there is a need for better information about the costs and benefits of technology, but that broader structural, incentive and resourcing issues in the health system also need to be addressed.

Suggested Citation

  • Productivity Commission, 2005. "Impacts of Advances in Medical Technology in Australia," Research Reports, Productivity Commission, Government of Australia, number 17.
  • Handle: RePEc:ris:prodcs:17
    Note: 700 pages
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    File URL: http://www.pc.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0003/17193/medicaltechnology.pdf
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    File URL: http://www.pc.gov.au/projects/study/medicaltechnology/docs/finalreport
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Bergh, Andreas, 2016. "The Future of Welfare Services: How Worried Should We Be about Wagner, Baumol and Ageing?," Working Paper Series 1109, Research Institute of Industrial Economics.
    2. Lichtenberg, Frank R., 2013. "The impact of therapeutic procedure innovation on hospital patient longevity: Evidence from Western Australia, 2000–2007," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 77(C), pages 50-59.
    3. Abelson, Julia & Giacomini, Mita & Lehoux, Pascale & Gauvin, Francois-Pierre, 2007. "Bringing `the public' into health technology assessment and coverage policy decisions: From principles to practice," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 82(1), pages 37-50, June.
    4. Lichtenberg, Frank R., 2014. "The impact of pharmaceutical innovation on longevity and medical expenditure in France, 2000–2009," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 13(C), pages 107-127.
    5. Lichtenberg, Frank R. & Tatar, Mehtap & Çalışkan, Zafer, 2014. "The effect of pharmaceutical innovation on longevity, hospitalization and medical expenditure in Turkey, 1999–2010," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 117(3), pages 361-373.
    6. Astolfi, Roberto & Lorenzoni, Luca & Oderkirk, Jillian, 2012. "Informing policy makers about future health spending: A comparative analysis of forecasting methods in OECD countries," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 107(1), pages 1-10.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    health; medical technology; medical advances; healthcare; technological advances; private healthcare; public healthcare; treatment; health technology assessment; medical procedures; pharmaceuticals;

    JEL classification:

    • I - Health, Education, and Welfare
    • O - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth
    • H - Public Economics

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