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A theory of failed bank resolution: Technological change and political economics

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  • DeYoung, Robert
  • Kowalik, Michal
  • Reidhill, Jack

Abstract

We model the failed bank resolution process as a repeated game between a utility-maximizing government resolution authority (RA) and a profit-maximizing banking industry. Limits to resolution technology and political/economic pressure create incentives for the RA to bail out failed complex banks; the inability of the RA to credibly commit to closing these banks creates an incentive for bank complexity. We solve the game in mixed strategies and find equilibrium conditions remarkably descriptive of government responses to actual and potential large bank insolvencies during the recent financial crisis. The central role of the technology constraint in this model highlights a crucial determinant of failed bank resolution policy that has been overlooked in the theory literature to date; without improved resolution technologies, future bank bailouts are inevitable. The effects of political pressure in this model remind us that regulatory reform (e.g., Dodd-Frank) is only as good as the regulators that implement the reform.

Suggested Citation

  • DeYoung, Robert & Kowalik, Michal & Reidhill, Jack, 2013. "A theory of failed bank resolution: Technological change and political economics," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 9(4), pages 612-627.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:finsta:v:9:y:2013:i:4:p:612-627
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jfs.2012.09.003
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Korte, Josef, 2015. "Catharsis—The real effects of bank insolvency and resolution," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 16(C), pages 213-231.
    2. Gómez, Fabiana, 2015. "Failed bank takeovers and financial stability," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 16(C), pages 45-58.
    3. Korte, Josef, 2013. "Catharsis - The real effects of bank insolvency and resolution," Discussion Papers 21/2013, Deutsche Bundesbank.
    4. Ignatowski, Magdalena & Korte, Josef, 2014. "Resolution threats and bank discipline: What Europe can learn for the Single Resolution Mechanism from US experience," SAFE Policy Letters 33, Goethe University Frankfurt, Research Center SAFE - Sustainable Architecture for Finance in Europe.
    5. Marinč, Matej & Rant, Vasja, 2014. "A cross-country analysis of bank bankruptcy regimes," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 13(C), pages 134-150.
    6. Ignatowski, Magdalena & Korte, Josef, 2014. "Wishful thinking or effective threat? Tightening bank resolution regimes and bank risk-taking," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 15(C), pages 264-281.
    7. Ignatowski, Magdalena & Korte, Josef & Werger, Charlotte, 2015. "Between capture and discretion - The determinants of distressed bank treatment and expected government support," Working Paper Series 1835, European Central Bank.
    8. White, Phoebe & Yorulmazer, Tanju, 2014. "Bank resolution concepts, trade-offs, and changes in practices," Economic Policy Review, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, issue Dec, pages 153-173.
    9. Mariathasan, Mike & Merrouche, Ouarda & Werger, Charlotte, 2014. "Bailouts And Moral Hazard: How Implicit Government Guarantees Affect Financial Stability," CEPR Discussion Papers 10311, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    10. De Caux, Robert & McGroarty, Frank & Brede, Markus, 2017. "The evolution of risk and bailout strategy in banking systems," Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and its Applications, Elsevier, vol. 468(C), pages 109-118.
    11. Michael Diemer & Uwe Vollmer, 2015. "What makes banking crisis resolution difficult? Lessons from Japan and the Nordic Countries," Eurasian Economic Review, Springer;Eurasia Business and Economics Society, vol. 5(2), pages 251-277, December.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Bank failures; Failed bank resolution; Bankruptcy; FDIC;

    JEL classification:

    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • G28 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Government Policy and Regulation

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