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Too many to fail--An analysis of time-inconsistency in bank closure policies

  • Acharya, Viral V.
  • Yorulmazer, Tanju

This Paper shows that bank closure policies suffer from a ‘too-many-to-fail’ problem: when the number of bank failures is large, the regulator finds it ex-post optimal to bail out some or all failed banks, whereas when the number of bank failures is small, failed banks can be acquired by the surviving banks. This gives banks incentives to herd and increases systemic risk, the risk that many banks may fail together. The ex-post optimal regulation may thus be sub-optimal from an ex-ante standpoint. We formalize this time-inconsistency of bank regulation. We also argue that by allowing banks to purchase failed banks at discounted prices and by partially nationalizing the bailed-out banks, a regulator may be able to mitigate the induced systemic risk.

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File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6WJD-4KTVP17-1/2/dc5f1c15a3331a418af9dd30193b0555
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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Financial Intermediation.

Volume (Year): 16 (2007)
Issue (Month): 1 (January)
Pages: 1-31

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Handle: RePEc:eee:jfinin:v:16:y:2007:i:1:p:1-31
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/622875

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  1. Douglas W. Diamond & Raghuram G. Rajan, . "Liquidity Risk, Liquidity Creation and Financial Fragility: A Theory of Banking," CRSP working papers 476, Center for Research in Security Prices, Graduate School of Business, University of Chicago.
  2. Boot, Arnoud W A & Thakor, Anjan V, 1993. "Self-Interested Bank Regulation," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 83(2), pages 206-12, May.
  3. Jeremy C. Stein & David S. Scharfstein, 2000. "Herd Behavior and Investment: Reply," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(3), pages 705-706, June.
  4. Rajan, Raghuram G, 1994. "Why Bank Credit Policies Fluctuate: A Theory and Some Evidence," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 109(2), pages 399-441, May.
  5. Viral Acharya & Tanju Yorulmazer, 2007. "Cash-in-the-market pricing and optimal resolution of bank failures," Bank of England working papers 328, Bank of England.
  6. Craig O. Brown & I. Serdar Dinç, 2005. "The Politics of Bank Failures: Evidence from Emerging Markets," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 120(4), pages 1413-1444, November.
  7. Valev, N, 1996. "International Lending by US Banks," Papers 96-010, Purdue University, Krannert School of Management - Center for International Business Education and Research (CIBER).
  8. Acharya, Viral V & Bharath, Sreedhar T & Srinivasan, Anand, 2003. "Understanding the Recovery Rates on Defaulted Securities," CEPR Discussion Papers 4098, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  9. Asli Demirgüç-Kunt & Enrica Detragiache, 2000. "Does Deposit Insurance Increase Banking System Stability?," IMF Working Papers 00/3, International Monetary Fund.
  10. Glenn Hoggarth & Jack Reidhill & Peter Sinclair, 2004. "On the resolution of banking crises: theory and evidence," Bank of England working papers 229, Bank of England.
  11. Hoggarth, Glenn & Jackson, Patricia & Nier, Erlend, 2005. "Banking crises and the design of safety nets," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 143-159, January.
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